Manual for Army Cooks: 1910

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1910 - Cooking - 185 pages
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Page 3 - Horse) is approved, and is published for the information and government of the Regular Army and the Organized Militia of the United States. By order of the Secretary of War: LEONARD WOOD, Major General, Chief of Staff.
Page 159 - Food for troops traveling on United States Army transports will be prepared from the articles of subsistence stores which compose the ration for troops in garrison, varied by the substitution of other articles of authorized subsistence stores, the total daily cost per man of the food consumed not to exceed 20 per cent more than the current cost of the garrison ration, except on Thanksgiving Day and Christmas, when 60 per cent increase over the same current cost is authorized.
Page 173 - ... and greatly extends the period during which it can be consumed with relish. For this reason it would be better to husband the supply of hard bread and bacon to use with the emergency ration when...
Page 171 - To fry, a small amount of grease (1 to 2 spoonfuls) is necessary. Put grease in mess pan and let come to a smoking temperature, then drop in the steak and, if about one-half inch thick, let fry for about one minute before turning — depending upon whether it is desired it shall be rare, medium, or well done. Then turn and fry briskly as before. Salt and pepper to taste. Applies to beef, veal, pork, mutton, venison, etc. Fresh meat — To broil.
Page 84 - Ingredients used : 15 pounds liver. 8 pounds bacon. 6 pounds onions, browned. 2 pounds flour. 4 gallons stock. Slice the bacon thin and wash in boiling hot water, not allowing it to remain in the water more than five minutes; fry quickly until medium well done. Roll the slices of liver in flour and fry in the fat left after frying; the bacon; add the liver and bacon to the stock and bring to a boil; thicken slightly with a flour batter; add the onions and salt to taste. Serve hot.
Page 172 - Or, having fried the bacon, pour the tomatoes into the meat can, the grease remaining, and add, if desired, two broken hardtacks. Set over a brisk fire and let come to a boil. Or, heat the tomatoes just as they come from the can, adding two pinches of salt and one-half spoonful of sugar, if desired. Or, especially...
Page 171 - ... and potatoes, onions, or other tender vegetables when the meat is about half done. Amount of vegetables to be added, about the same as meat, depending upon supply and taste. Salt and pepper to taste. Applies to all fresh meats and fowls. The proportion of meat and vegetables used varies with their abundance and fixed quantities can not be adhered to. Fresh fish can be handled as above, except that it is cooked much quicker, and potatoes, onions, and canned corn are the only vegetables generally...
Page 171 - Fill cup about one-third full of meat and cover with about 1 inch of water. Let boil or simmer about one hour or until tender. Add such fibrous vegetables as carrots, turnips, or cabbage, cut into small chunks, soon after the meat is put on to boil, and potatoes, onions, or other tender vegetables when the meat is about half done. Amount of vegetables to be added, about the same as meat, depending upon supply and taste. Salt and pepper to taste. Applies to all fresh meats and fowls. The proportion...
Page 173 - Add sufficient cold water to make a batter that will drip freely from the spoon, adding a pinch of salt. Pour into the mess pan, which should contain the grease from fried bacon, or a spoonful of butter or fat, and place over medium hot coals, sufficient to bake so that in from five to seven minutes the flapjack may be turned by a quick toss of the pan. Fry from five to seven minutes longer, or until, by examination, it is found to be done.
Page 95 - If the beans are to be served for dinner, the above work should be attended to the preceding evening, and the fire should be left so as to keep up a slow heat for the greater part of the night. The first thing in the morning more water should be put in (if necessary), covering the beans about 1 inch. If the breakfast requires a hot fire, the oven door should be left partly open, so that the beans will only simmer. If the oven can not be thus regulated, the beans should be removed and placed on the...

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