My Life in the South

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Salem Observer Book and Job Print, 1885 - African Americans - 83 pages
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Page 19 - I was around with him in the barn yard when but a very small boy; of course that gave me an early relish for the occupation of hostler, and I soon made known my preference to Col. Singleton, who was a sportsman, and had fine horses. And, although I was too small to work, the Colonel granted my request; hence I was allowed to be numbered among those who took care of the fine horses, and learned to ride. But I soon found that my new occupation demanded a little more than I cared for. It was not long...
Page 23 - When mother stripped me and looked at the wounds that were upon me, she burst into tears, and said, "if he were not so small I would not mind it so much; this will break his constitution; I am going to master about it, because I know he will not allow Mr. Young to treat this child so." And I thought to myself that had mother gone to master about it, it would have helped me some, for he and she grew up together and he thought a great deal of her. But father said to mother, "you better not go to master,...
Page 60 - ... the bible or the sieve turned on the name of one whom they knew often stole, and he did not acknowledge that he stole the chicken of which he was accused, he would have to acknowledge his previously stolen goods or that he thought of stealing at the time when the chicken or dress was stolen. Then this examining committee would justify the turning of the bible or sieve on the above statement of the accused person. The third way of detecting thieves was taught by the fathers and mothers of the...
Page 43 - While passing along many of the negroe's left their master's fields and joined us ... some were yelling and wringing their hands, while others were singing little hymns that they had been accustomed to for the consolation of those that were going away, such as: When we all meet in heaven, There is no parting there; When we all meet in heaven, There is parting no more.
Page 17 - ... see him; they were glad when he died. But while so much was said of Uncle Esau, which was also true of many other negro drivers, yet the overseers were not free from their portion of cruelty practised upon the defenceless slaves in gone by days. I have said that the family from which mother came, most of them had trades of some kind; but she had to take her chance in the field with those who had to weather the storm. But my readers are not to think that those whom I have spoken of as having trades...
Page 16 - I never learned what name he went by before he was brought to this country. I only know that he stated that Col. Dick Singleton gave him the name of William, by which he was known up to the day of his death. Father had a surname, Stroyer, which he could not use in public, as the surname Stroyer would be against the law; he was known only by the name of William Singleton, because it was his master's name.
Page 56 - ... for something, and as I got in I saw something black and white, but did not stop to see what it was, and running out said there was a witch in the room, but father having been born in Africa did not believe in such things, so he called me a fool and whipped me and the witch got scared and ran out of the door; it turned out to be our own black and white cat that we children played with every day. Although it proved to be the cat, and father did not believe in witches, still I held the idea that...
Page 19 - I was allowed to be numbered among those who took care of the fine horses, and learned to ride. But I soon found that my new occupation demanded a little more than I cared for. It was not long after I had entered my new work before they put me upon the back of a horse which threw me to the ground almost as soon as I reached his back. It hurt me a little, but that was not the...
Page 16 - There were two reasons given by the slave holders why they did not allow a slave to use his own name, but rather that of the master. The first was that if he ran away, he would not be so easily detected by using his own name, as if he used that of his master instead. The second was that to allow him to use his own name would be sharing an honor which was due only to...
Page 20 - I found that father and mother could not save me from punishment, as they themselves had to submit to the same treatment, I concluded to appeal to the sympathy of the groom, who seemed to have had full control over me; but my pitiful cries never touched his sympathy, for things seemed to grow worse rather than better; so I made up my mind to stem the storm the best I could/. ] I have said that Col. Singleton had fine horses, which he kept for racing, and he owned two very noted ones, named Capt....

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