The Losing Role

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Createspace Independent Pub, Dec 10, 2010 - Fiction - 236 pages
2 Reviews
In the last winter of WWII a failed German actor, Max Kaspar, is forced to join an absurdly desperate secret mission in which he must impersonate an enemy American officer. So Max cooks up his own fanatical plan -- he'll use his false identity to escape tyranny and war and flee to the America he'd once abandoned. Max the performer is hardly a soldier let alone a double-crossing commando, yet in the deadly Battle of the Bulge he has to fool battle-shocked American GIs as well as dodge discovery by his reckless German comrades. Belgium's Ardennes forest becomes a snowbound hell and the magical America he'd loved is lost to him, replaced by a somber invading juggernaut. In the end, Max's gambles will lead him to a grim but honest payoff. Part espionage thriller, part expatriate noir and the first in a series, The Losing Role is based on an actual false flag operation that's been made infamous in legend but in reality was a doomed farce. In all the tragic details and with some dark humor, this is the story of an aspiring talent who got in over his head and tried to break free.

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User Review  - quiBee - LibraryThing

This is the story of a failed actor who is plucked from the Eastern Front, to take part in an elaborate but poorly thought-out plan to infiltrate behind American lines in the last days of WWII ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - hideandread - LibraryThing

World War II and the German false flag operation are historical facts, but Anderson takes poetic license with the details, introducing us to an imaginary German soldier known as Max Kaspar. His ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Steve Anderson is the author of the Kaspar Brothers series (The Losing Role, Liberated, Lost Kin), Under False Flags: A Novel, and other works centered on WWII and its aftermath. In The Other Oregon: A Thriller, he writes about his home state. Anderson was a Fulbright Fellow in Germany and is also a literary translator of German. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

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