Familiar Lectures on Botany, Practical, Elementary and Physiological: With an Appendix, Containing Descriptions of the Plants of the United States and Exotics, &c. For the Use of Seminaries and Private Students

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F. J. Huntington, 1836 - Botany - 424 pages
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Page 150 - Joseph is a fruitful bough, even a fruitful bough by a well whose branches run over the wall. The archers have sorely grieved him, and shot at him, and hated him: but his bow abode in strength, and the arms of his hands were made strong by the hands of the mighty God of Jacob...
Page 206 - The glory of Lebanon shall come unto thee, the fir tree, the pine tree, and the box together, to beautify the place of my sanctuary; and I will make the place of my feet glorious.
Page 220 - And Solomon's wisdom excelled the wisdom of all the children of the east country, and all the wisdom of Egypt.
Page 236 - God, by whom all things were made, and without whom was not any thing made that was made.
Page 191 - The eternal regions : lowly reverent Towards either throne they bow, and to the ground With solemn adoration down they cast Their crowns inwove with amarant and gold ; Immortal amarant, a flower which once In Paradise, fast by the tree of life, Began to bloom...
Page 219 - And God said, Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed is in itself, upon the earth: and it was so. And the earth brought forth grass, and herb yielding seed after his kind, and the tree yielding fruit, whose seed was in itself, after his kind: and God saw that it was good.
Page 220 - O flowers That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation, and my last At even, which I bred up with tender hand From the first opening bud, and gave ye names, Who now shall rear ye to the sun, or rank Your tribes, and water from the ambrosial fount...
Page 14 - The study of Botany seems peculiarly adapted to females : the objects of its investigation are beautiful and delicate ; — its pursuits, leading to exercise in the open air, are conducive to health and cheerfulness. It is not a sedentary study which can be acquired in the library, but the objects of the science are scattered over the surface of the earth, along the banks of the winding brooks, on the borders of precipices, the sides of mountains, and the depths of the forest.
Page 204 - When the saint preached the gospel to the pagan Irish, he illustrated the doctrine of the Trinity by showing them a trefoil, or three-leaved grass with one stalk, which operating to their conviction, the shamrock, which is a, bundle of this grass, was ever afterwards worn upon this Saint's anniversary to commemorate the event.
Page 45 - That make so gay the solitary place Where no eye sees them. And the fairer forms That cultivation glories in, are his. He sets the bright procession on its way, And marshals all the order of the year. He marks the bounds which winter may not pass, A.nd blunts his pointed fury. In its case Russet and rude, folds up the tender germ Uninjured, with inimitable art, And ere one flowery season fades and dies Designs the blooming wonders of the next.

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