The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1884 - Confederate States of America
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Page 210 - ... keep the word of promise to the ear, and break it to the hope" — we have presumed to court the assistance of the friends of the drama to strengthen our infant institution.
Page 250 - I had a clear field about 200 yards wide in my immediate front, and contented myself with keeping the enemy's infantry at that distance during the rest of the day. In this position we rested for the night.
Page 385 - River, and from reliable sources of information, that his aim would be to cut off' my communications in West -Tennessee with the Eastern and Southern States, by operating from the Tennessee River, between Crump's Landing and Eastport, as a base, I determined to foil his designs by concentrating all my available forces at and around Corinth. Meanwhile, having called on the Governors of the States of Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana, to furnish additional troops, some of them, chiefly...
Page 387 - AS >1 oh us ton, fell mortally wounded, and died 071 the field at 2.30 p. in., after having shown the highest qualities of the commander and a personal intrepidity that inspired all around him and gave resistless impulsion to his columns at critical moments. The chief command then devolved upon me, though at the time I was greatly prostrated and suffering from the prolonged sickness with which I had been afflicted since early in February.
Page 631 - The expedition thus failed, from causes which neither reflected upon the genius by which it was planned, nor upon the intrepidity and discretion of those engaged in conducting it.But for the accident of meeting the extra trains, which could not have been anticipated, the movement would have been a complete success, and the whole aspect of the war in the South and South-west would have been at once changed. The expedition itself, in the daring of its conception, had the wildness of a romance, while...
Page 386 - Polk followed the second line, at the distance of about eight hundred yards, in lines of brigades...
Page 667 - ... to cast no blame when I tell you each of our commanders along our line from Richmond to Corinth supposes himself to be confronted by numbers superior to his own. Under this pressure we thinned the line on the upper Potomac, until yesterday it was broken at heavy loss to us, and General Banks put in great peril, out of which he is not yet extricated, and may be actually captured. We need men to repair this breach, and have them not at hand. My dear general, I feel justified to rely very much on...
Page 569 - General Hardee, who commanded the first line, says in his report: " Upon the death of General Johnston, the command having devolved upon General Beauregard, the conflict was continued until near sunset, and the advance divisions were within a few hundred yards of Pittsburg, where the enemy were huddled in confusion, when the order to withdraw was received.
Page 387 - It was after 6 p. in., as before said, when the enemy's last position was carried, and his forces finally broke and sought refuge behind a commanding eminence covering the Pittsburg Landing, not more than half a mile distant, and under the guns of the gunboats, which opened on our eager columns a fierce and annoying fire with shot and shell of the heaviest description.
Page 387 - Pittsburg, under the shelter of the heavy guns of his iron-clad gunboats, and wo remained undisputed masters of his well-selected, admirably provided cantonments, after over twelve hours of obstinate conflict with his forces, who had been beaten from them and the contiguous covert, but only by a sustained onset of all the men we could bring into action.

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