The Image of Edessa

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BRILL, 2009 - History - 226 pages
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The Image of Edessa, also later known as the Mandylion, was a relic of Christ, a cloth imprinted with his features which he had used to wipe his face, and subsequently used to cure King Agbar of Edessa, the first Christian ruler. This book collects and provides parallel translations of all the available written evidence for the image, along with detailed analysis of the history of the image. Guscin deftly seperates fact from legend, for while the story of King Agbar is certainly mythical, an image of some sort did definitely exist by the mid tenth century when it was translated to Constantinople.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Part One The Texts and Translations
5
1 The Narratio de imagine Edessena
7
2 The Sermon of Gregory Referendarius
70
3 The Synaxarion
88
4 The Synaxarion according to Iveron 797
112
5 The Abgar letters recorded separately in Mount Athos manuscripts
116
6 The Menaion
124
1 The Abgar Legend
141
2 The Origins of the Image
165
3 Edessa and Constantinople
177
4 The Fourth Crusade
185
5 The Image of Edessa in art
193
6 What was the Image of Edessa?
201
7 Conclusions
211
Bibliography
217

Plates 115
139
Part Two The Image of Edessa
141

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About the author (2009)

Mark Guscin, BA Hons Degree (1st Class) in Latin from University of Manchester (1984), is currently Manager of International Relations for the City Council of La Coruņa (Spain). He has published several books on medieval history and on the Napoleonic Wars, including The History of the Sudarium of Oviedo (2004), The Burial Cloths of Christ (2000) and (in Spanish) Moore 1763 - 1809 (2001).