History of the Missions in Japan and Paraguay

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D. & J. Sadlier, 1856 - Christian martyrs - 282 pages
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OCLC Number: 123219831
Related Subjects:(3)
Missions -- Japan.
Missions -- Paraguay.
Jesuits -- Missions.
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Page 44 - I confess to thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hidden these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them to little ones. Yea, Father, for so it hath seemed good in thy sight.
Page 122 - ... blow, until beneath their rude and unaccustomed hands she painfully expired. For a year and a day the bodies were left to hang upon their crosses, as a terror to all others of the same religion; but Christians were not wanting to watch the blackening corpses, and, with a love like that of Rizpah, the mother of the sons of Saul, to drive from thence the fowls of the air by day, and the beasts of the field by night; and finally, when the period of prohibition was expired, reverently to gather the...
Page 121 - ... stabbed, without waiting for the rest of the victims. Luis and Magdalen were tied up next. They bound the child so violently that he could not refrain from shrieking ; but when they asked him if he was afraid to die, he said he was not ; and so they took and set him up directly opposite his mother. For a brief interval the martyr and her adopted child gazed silently on each other; then, summoning all her strength, she said, " Son, we are going to heaven : take- courage, and cry, ' Jesus, Mary...
Page 130 - ... exempted from the sentence. Very different from the ordinary effects of such opposite judgments were the feelings elicited by them on the present occasion : those who were to die blessed God, in an ecstasy of pious joy, that He had called them to suffer for the faith ; while she who was to live — a widow, and now all but childless — gave way to an agony of grief at the double loss she was destined to endure. While she wept over her cruel lot, Martha called her grandchildren, and embracing...
Page 4 - Go ye therefore and teach all nations, baptising them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost...
Page 5 - The effort to Christianise the heathen is an honourable characteristic of the Spanish conquests. The Puritan, with equal religious zeal, did comparatively little for the conversion of the Indian, content, as it would seem, with having secured to himself the inestimable privilege of worshipping God in his own way. Other adventurers who have...
Page 109 - CHRISTIANS. victim is fastened to the cross (not nailed) by the hands and arras, and by an iron ring passing round the neck, so as to keep the head in an erect position ; and a sharp lance then driven into the heart extinguishes life in a moment. Such was the death which the martyrs were now to endure ; and, lying each upon his own cross, they waited for the moment when they were to be lifted up on high. Troops had been arranged round the foot of the hill, in order to prevent any but the nearest...
Page 121 - God, not only that +v-vy were to suffer for Jesus, but also that they were to suffer on a cross like Jesus ; and then, robed in their best attire, they set off for the place of execution in palanquins which the guards had provided for the purpose. The Giffiaques walked at their side...
Page 131 - ... hands, bow down your heads, and cry out Jesus ! Mary ! with your latest breath. Oh, how wretched am I that I cannot be with you in that hour ! " Then, hiding her face in the arms of her little ones, the poor mother burst into an uncontrollable fit of weeping, moving the very soldiers to such compassion, that, fearful of yielding to their feelings, they tore the children from her embraces, and almost threw them into the palanquin which was to convey them and their grandmother to the place of execution....
Page 119 - II. * 10 beseeching that lady to have pity upon them both, and by advising compliance with the king's commands, to spare herself the anguish of losing a son, and himself that of imbruing his hands in the blood of a friend. The appeal was made in vain ; and the governor left the house, indignantly declaring that by her obstinacy she was guilty ot the death of her son.

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