An Old World as Seen Through Young Eyes: Or, Travels Around the World

Front Cover
D. & J. Sadlier, 1876 - Voyages around the world - 316 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 46 - The moon on the east oriel shone, Through slender shafts of shapely stone, By foliaged tracery combined ; Thou would'st have thought some fairy's hand, 'Twixt poplars straight, the osier wand, In many a freakish knot had twined ; Then framed a spell, when the work was done, And changed the willow- wreaths to stone.
Page 114 - GIRT round with rugged mountains The fair Lake Constance lies ; In her blue heart reflected Shine back the starry skies ; And, watching each white cloudlet Float silently and slow, You think a piece of Heaven Lies on our earth below ! Midnight is there : and Silence, Enthroned in Heaven, looks down Upon her own calm mirror, Upon a sleeping town : For Bregenz, that quaint city Upon the Tyrol shore, Has stood above Lake Constance A thousand years and more. Her battlements and towers...
Page 43 - Some of his skill he taught to me; And, Warrior, I could say to thee The words that cleft Eildon hills in three, And bridled the Tweed with a curb of stone.
Page 55 - And there will I keep you forever, Yes, forever and a day, Till the walls shall crumble to ruin, And moulder in dust away...
Page 7 - The bear went over the mountain The bear went over the mountain The bear went over the mountain To see what he could see...
Page 246 - ... loss from the 68th, who had been placed there to intercept them. No blame can be attached to the 68th ; no regiment has ever been able to prevent the Maoris from effecting their escape. They piss with ease through swamps where the British soldier could never gain a footing. Amphibious in their habits, they are as much at home in the water as on land. Their loss on this occasion was trifling : it certainly did not exceed thirty men, while ours amounted to 104 killed and wounded, including a larger...
Page 81 - ... current of royal opinions ; and we see the monarch espousing the cause of the Reformation during the ten succeeding years of Thomas Cromwell's power. The Tower dungeons were again filled ; but principally with those who withstood Henry's claim to be head of the church. The most illustrious of these was the gifted, the excellent, the beloved, and brilliant Sir Thomas More, Lord Chancellor — and the venerable Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, whose imprisonment at the advanced age of eighty seems...
Page 266 - ... of anything but indolence on the part of the rural population. Early in the morning a crowd of natives may be seen flocking into Honolulu, all carrying something to sell. Most of them have large calabashes suspended in a netting at each end of a pole, which they carry across one shoulder, the contents being all sorts of small articles, kalo and poi, and fruits and vegetables, and milk and eggs, and, what is the safest speculation of all, water fresh from the cold atmosphere of the mountains ;...
Page 83 - ... •curious shield, fitted with a small breech-loading gun, and grated aperture for taking aim. A stand, containing battle-axes and maces combined with short guns. At the end of the room is a figure representing Queen Elizabeth, mounted on a carved horse. Her dress is imitated from an old painting. She is attended by her page, and on either side is an officer of the household in armour. The wall behind the Queen is adorned with a painting of old St. Paul's Cathedral The figure on the right at...
Page 140 - ... four concentric curves ; each pillar being thirty-five feet in height, formed of yellow stone. At the extremities of the colonnade are large portals, which give a finished appearance to the whole and admit carriages to pass through them to the other sides of the building. The interior of the church is in the form of a cross, each arm terminating in a Corinthian portico. The aisles are flanked by massive pillars of spotted granite bearing a high polish, and ornamented with gilded capitals.

Bibliographic information