Memoirs of Prince Rupert, and the Cavaliers: Including Their Private Correspondence, Now First Published from the Original Manuscripts, Volume 2

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R. Bentley, 1849 - Great Britain
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Page 41 - He can requite thee; for he knows the charms That call fame on such gentle acts as these, And he can spread thy name o'er lands and seas, Whatever clime the sun's bright circle warms. Lift not thy spear against the Muses
Page 41 - CAPTAIN or colonel, or knight in arms, Whose chance on these defenceless doors may seize, If deed of honour did thee ever please, Guard them, and him within protect from harms. He can requite thee, for he knows the charms That call fame on such gentle acts as these, And he can spread thy name o'er lands and seas, Whatever clime the sun's bright circle warms. Lift not thy spear against the Muses...
Page 461 - The LORD God of gods, the LORD God of gods, he knoweth, and Israel he shall know ; if it be in rebellion, or if in transgression against the LORD, (save us not this day...
Page 484 - And to be short, all that ever the people of Rome might do either in centuriatis comitiis or tributis, the same may be done by the parliament of England which representeth and hath the power of the whole realm, both the head and body.
Page 19 - King is come to marshal us, in all his armour drest, And he has bound a snow-white plume upon his gallant crest. He looked upon his people, and a tear was in his eye; He looked upon the traitors, and his glance was stern and high. Right graciously he smiled on us, as rolled from wing to wing, Down all our line, a deafening shout, "God save our Lord the King!
Page 294 - ... received small comfort from that imagination. Thus fell that incomparable young man in the four-and-thirtieth year of his age, having so much despatched the true business of life that the eldest rarely attain to that immense knowledge, and the youngest enter not into the world with more innocency. Whosoever leads such a life, needs be the less anxious upon how short warning it is taken from him.
Page 483 - The most high and absolute power of the realm of England consisteth in the parliament...
Page 208 - It is a tradition, that he was seen first moving in the direction of his father,in-law's (Simeon's) house at Pyrton. There he had in youth married the first wife of his love, and thither he would have gone to die. But Rupert's cavalry were covering the plain between. Turning his horse, therefore, he rode back across the grounds of Hazeley in his way to Thame.
Page 228 - I have heard that Mr. Shakspeare was a natural wit, without any art at all ; hee frequented the plays all his younger time, but in his elder days lived at Stratford, and supplied the stage with two plays every year, and for itt had an allowance so large, that hee spent att the rate of 1,000/. a-year, as I have heard.
Page 100 - ... to take command in a profession he had not willingly chosen, yet as his advice was of great authority with all the commanders, being always one in the council of war, and whose notable abilities they had still use of in their civil transactions, so he exposed his person to all action, travel, and hazard ; and by too forward engaging himself in this last, received a mortal shot by a musket, a little above the knee, of which he died in the instant...

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