The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Volume 2

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T.C. Newby, 1848 - 342 pages
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - antao - www.librarything.com

(Original Review, 1981-02-04) “The Tenant of Wildfell Hall” has received a lot of scholarly attention more recently, it has various depths beyond the exploration of domestic violence. She was partly ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Griffin22 - www.librarything.com

Weird book. It starts with the narrator meeting the mysterious widow, the Tenant of Wildfell Hall, but a quarter of the way through the book it becomes a flashback in the form of the widow’s diary ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
5
II
29
III
42
IV
62
V
83
VI
93
VII
112
VIII
138
XI
189
XII
201
XIII
224
XIV
235
XV
251
XVI
269
XVII
297
XVIII
316

IX
150
X
177
XIX
344

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Page 108 - I'm told I ought not to think of myself — 'You know, Rose, in all household matters, we have only two things to consider, first, what's proper to be done, and, secondly, what's most agreeable to the gentlemen of the house — anything will do for the ladies.
Page 5 - You must go back with me to the autumn of 1827. My father, as you know, was a sort of gentleman farmer in — shire; and I, by his express desire, succeeded him in the same quiet occupation, not very willingly, for ambition urged me to higher aims, and self-conceit assured me that, in disregarding its voice, I was burying my talent in the earth, and hiding my light under a...
Page 58 - ... precepts of a higher authority, that they should know beforehand to refuse the evil and choose the good, and require no experimental proofs to teach them the evil of transgression. I would not send a poor girl into the world, unarmed against her foes, and ignorant of the snares that beset her...
Page 58 - ... transgression. I would not send a poor girl into the world, unarmed against her foes, and ignorant of the snares that beset her path; nor would I watch and guard her, till, deprived of self-respect and self-reliance, she lost the power or the will to watch and guard herself; - and as for my son - if I thought he would grow up to be what you call a man of the world - one that has "seen life...
Page 318 - I discover are to be depicted to meet his eye, or stored in my memory to be told him at some future period. This, at least, is the hope that I cherish, the fancy that lights me on my lonely way. It may be only an ignis fatuus, after all, but it can do no harm to follow it with my eyes and rejoice in its lustre, as long as it does not lure me from the path I ought to keep; and I think it will not, for I have thought deeply on my aunt's advice, and I see clearly, now, the folly of throwing myself away...
Page 49 - Mrs. Markham thinks it will do you good, as you were tired with your walk ; but she will not oblige you to take it! — I dare say you will do very well without. He detests the very sight of wine," she added, " and the smell of it almost makes him sick. I have been accustomed to make him swallow a little wine or weak spirits-and-water, by way of medicine when he was sick, and, in fact, I have done what I could to make him hate them.
Page 20 - Just then, she happened to raise her eyes, and they met mine; I did not choose to withdraw my gaze, and she turned again to her book, but with a momentary, indefinable expression of quiet scorn, that was inexpressibly provoking to me. 'She thinks me an impudent puppy,
Page 273 - I are in any hurry to get you off our hands, and I may venture to say, there will be no lack of suitors; for you can boast a good family, a pretty considerable fortune and expectations, and, I may as well tell you likewise - for, if I don't, others will - that you have a fair share of beauty besides - and I hope you may never have cause to regret it!' 'I hope not, aunt; but why should you fear it?

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