The Marquis of Carabas

Front Cover
House of Stratus, Jan 11, 2008 - 392 pages
1 Review
London is rife with impoverished French nobility who have escaped the horror of the French revolution and journeyed to England to enlist the help of their fellow Catholics. Quentin de Morlaix, already sympathetic to these disenfranchised French aristocrats, finds that he too has his own personal reasons to pray for an end to the Revolution. He sets off for France, and enters a life of confusion, mystery and suspense - and bloody execution.
 

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This was an amazing book. The Marquise de Carabas is a name I've seen elsewhere like in Gaiman's Neverwhere, but I did not know until I read this book that it meant the Marquise of Nothing. This is an ... Read full review

Contents

MasteratArms
3
Mademoiselle de Chesnières
11
The Brothers
22
The Heritage
32
The Acknowledgment
38
Monsieur de Puisaye
50
The SafeConduct
59
The Claim
67
The Warning
180
The Assault
187
Inferences
201
La Prevalaye
206
The Rescue
222
The Thanks
236
book Three
243
DHervillys Command
245

The HomeComing
78
Madame de Bellanger
86
Lazare Hoche
99
Departure
107
Boisgelin
113
Boishardi
121
The Chouans
132
book
141
The Return
143
The Trust
151
The Second Journey
160
In Possession
171
The RatTrap
258
Dalliance
275
Mutiny
294
Grouchys Division
305
Bellanger in Command
317
The Dupes
325
The Disaster
337
The Court Martial
345
The Avenger
356
Margots Child
367
Fulfilment
376
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Rafael Sabatini, creator of some of the world’s best-loved heroes, was born in Italy in 1875 to an English mother and Italian father, both well-known opera singers. He was educated in Portugal and Switzerland, but at seventeen moved to England, where, after a brief stint in the business world, he started to write. Fluent in a total of five languages, he nonetheless chose to write in English, claiming that 'all the best stories are written in [that language]’. His writing career was launched with a collection of short stories, followed by several novels. Fame, however, came with 'Scaramouche’, the much-loved story of the French Revolution, which became an international bestseller. 'Captain Blood’ followed soon after, which resulted in a renewed enthusiasm for his earlier work which were rushed into reprint. For many years a prolific writer, he was forced to abandon writing in the 1940’s through illness and eventually died in 1950. Sabatini is best remembered for his heroic characters and high-spirited novels, many of which have been adapted into classic films, including Scaramouche, Captain Blood and The Sea Hawk. They appeal to both a male and female audience with drama, romance and action, all placed in historical settings. It was once stated in the 'Daily Telegraph’ that 'one wonders if there is another storyteller so adroit at filling his pages with intrigue and counter-intrigue, with danger threaded with romance, with a background of lavish colour, of silks and velvets, of swords and jewels.’

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