The Housekeeper's Guide: Or, A Plain & Practical System of Domestic Cookery

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Longmans & Company, 1838 - Cooking, English - 480 pages
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Contents

I
i
II
ix
III
13
V
32
VII
44
IX
111
XI
154
XII
172
XVI
242
XVII
298
XIX
331
XXI
357
XXIII
385
XXIV
422
XXV
432
XXVI
441

XIII
194
XV
222
XXVII
448

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Page iv - Reason's whole pleasure, all the joys of sense, Lie in three words, health, peace, and competence.
Page 410 - ... is to be tunned or put into the cask. Put now into a muslin bag a pound and a half of ginger, bruised, a pound of allspice, two ounces of cinnamon, and four or six ounces of hops; suspend the bag with the spice in the cask by a string, not long enough to let it touch the bottom; let the liquor work in the cask for a fortnight, and fill up in the usual manner. The wine will be fit to tap in two months, and is not improved by keeping like many other wines. Elderberries alone may be used.
Page 414 - ... and the following day do the same, but do not squeeze the fruit, only drain the liquor as dry as you can from it. The last time pass it through a canvass previously wet with vinegar to prevent waste.
Page 95 - Horse-radish is the garnish for roast beef, and for fish in general ; for the latter, slices of lemon are sometimes laid alternately with heaps of horse-radish. Slices of lemon for boiled fowl, turkey, and fish, and for roast veal and calf's head. Carrot in slices for boiled beef, hot or cold. Barberries fresh or preserved for game.
Page 381 - As all these vegetables do not come in season together, the best method of doing this is to prepare a large jar of pickle at such time of the year as most of the things may be obtained, and add the others as they come in season. Thus the pickle will be nearly a year in making, and ought to stand another year before using, when, if properly managed, it will be excellent, but will keep and continue to improve for years.
Page 424 - Put a board under and over the vat, and place it in the press : in two hours turn it out, and put a fresh cheese-cloth ; press it again for eight or nine hours ; then salt it all over, and turn it again in the vat, and let it stand in the press fourteen or sixteen hours ; observing to put the cheeses last made undermost.
Page 190 - Fried Oysters. — Large oysters are the best. Simmer for a minute or two in their own liquor ; drain perfectly dry; dip in yolks of eggs, and then in bread-crumbs, seasoned with nutmeg, cayenne, and salt ; fry them of a light brown. They are chiefly used as garnish for fish, or for rump steaks ; but if intended to be eaten alone, make a little thick melted butter, moistened with the liquor of the oysters, and serve as sauce.
Page 95 - Mint, either with or without parsley, for roast lamb, either hot or cold. Pickled gherkins, capers, or onions, for some kinds of boiled meat and slews.
Page iii - Notwithstanding the large size, beauty and finish of the very numerous illustrations, it will be observed that the price is so low as to place it within the reach of all members of the profession. We know of no work on surgical anatomy which can compete with it.
Page 375 - Do not boil the vinegar, for if so its strength will evaporate. Put the vinegar and spice into a jar, bung it down tightly, tie a bladder over, and let it stand on the hob or on a trivet by the side of the fire for three or four days ; shake it well three or four times a day.

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