Indi'n Humor: Bicultural Play in Native America

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Oxford University Press, May 27, 1993 - Literary Criticism - 416 pages
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Drawing upon history, psychology, folklore, linguistics, anthropology, and the arts, this book challenges "wooden Indian" stereotypes to redefine negative attitudes and humorless approaches to Native American peoples. Moving from tribal culture to interethnic literature, Lincoln covers the traditional Trickster of origin myths, historical ironies, Euroamericans "playing Indian," feminist Indian humor at home, contemporary painters and playwrights reinventing Coyote, popular mixed-blood music and Red English, and three Native American novelists, Louise Erdrich, James Welch, and N. Scott Momaday. Indi'n Humor documents and interprets the contexts of laughter among Native Americans, as they see and are seen by the rest of the world. The study comes to focus comically on the poets, visual artists, playwrights, and novelists who make up the cultural renaissance of the past twenty years.
 

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Contents

Preamble
3
1 RedWhite American
21
2 Historical Slippage
58
3 Playing Indian
89
4 Old Tricks New Twists
120
5 Feminist Indins
171
Louise Erdrich
205
James Welch
254
Coda
309
Reservation Jokes
315
Teaching Indin Humor
323
Interview with Hanay Geiogamah
326
Notes
339
Selected Bibliography
351
A Bibliography
374
Index
377

Momaday and Norman
280

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About the author (1993)

Editor Kenneth Lincoln has taught Native American Studies for forty years at the University of California, Los Angeles, and published more than a dozen books in the field.

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