The Craftsman, Volume 9

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R. Francklin., 1737 - Great Britain
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Page 19 - Men's having fuch Places in the Exchequer, as the very Profit of them depends on the Money given to the King in Parliament.
Page 199 - I will not fpeak what I fpake laft, but other Matter in other Terms. They be like the Wife Men of Chaldee, that could never give Judgment 'till they faw the Entrails of Beafts. Our Statutes penal, be like the Beaft born in the Morning, at his full Growth at Noon, and dead at Night: So thefe Statutes quick in Execution, are like a Wonder for nine Days; fo long after, they be at Height; but by the End of the Year, they are carried dead in a Balket to the Juftice's Houfe.
Page 26 - Rules ; but tho" there be a Score of them together,. exert the Faculty of Speech all at once : And really, if we do but remember that it is their whole Bufmefs and Ambition to be only voluble, without troubling themfelves with being intelligible, we cannot blame them for exercifing their Tongues, as they do their Fans, in all Weathers, merely for a little Pz~ ğde, or becaufe they are ufed to it.
Page 63 - God hath given him the use, but the devil the application. In a word, I believe him to be still that grand apostate to the Commonwealth, who must not expect to be pardoned in this world till he be dispatched to the other.
Page 11 - There is fcarce fuch a Thing under the Sun as a " corrupt People, where 'the Government is uncorrupt.
Page 22 - and ftill muft be raifed, towards this War, are not " difpofed away in fo fair a Manner as ought to be ; " and I am afraid They will fay their Money is not *
Page 19 - Sort of Supply, give an Account from him how much is needful towards the Paying fuch an Army, or fuch a Fleet -, and then immediately give, by his ready Vote, what he had before afk'd by his Mailer's Order.
Page 199 - ... in his pocket as his clerk's fee (when God knows he keeps but two or three hinds) for his maintenance.
Page 47 - ... he would not suffer his men to affront the established religion of any place at which he touched : but he took it ill, that he set on the Spaniards to do it, for he would have all the world to know that an Englishman was only to be punished by an Englishman...
Page 46 - Blake with the fleet happened to be at Malaga before he made war upon Spain : and some of his seamen went ashore, and met the hostie carried about ; and not only paid no respect to it, but laughed at those who did...

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