The American Architect and Building News, Volumes 93-94

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James R. Osgood & Company, 1908 - Architecture
 

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Page 71 - When we mean to build, We first survey the plot, then draw the model ; And when we see the figure of the house, Then must we rate the cost of the erection ; Which if we find outweighs ability, What do we then but draw anew the model In fewer offices, or at least desist To build at all...
Page 11 - 69. Know old Cambridge ? Hope you do. — Born there ? Don't say so ! I was, too. (Born in a house with a gambrel-roof, — Standing still, if you must have proof. — " Gambrel ? — Gambrel ? " — Let me beg You'll look at a horse's hinder leg, — First great angle above the hoof, — That's the gambrel ; hence gambrel-roof.) — Nicest place that ever was seen, — Colleges red and Common green, Sidewalks brownish with trees between.
Page 95 - ... the event of the Government establishing in the City of Washington a National Art Gallery, then that the said pictures and other articles above mentioned should be delivered to the said National Art Gallery and become its property; and that the said National Art Gallery is the National Art Gallery established by the United States of America at, and in connection with, the Smithsonian Institution located in the District of Columbia and described in the Act of Congress entitled an Act to establish...
Page 94 - Court of the District of Columbia, sitting in Equity, and by the authority thereof, adjudged, ordered and decreed, That there has been established by the United States of America in the City of Washington a National Art Gallery, within the scope and meaning of that part of the codicil bearing date April 21, 1902, made by the said Harriet Lane Johnston to her Last Will and Testament, in the proceedings in this case mentioned, wherein she gave and bequeathed the pictures. miniatures and other articles,...
Page 94 - It is, therefore, on this eleventh day of July, in the year 1906, by the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, sitting in Equity, and by the authority thereof, adjudged, ordered and decreed, That there has been established by the United States of America in the City of Washington a National Art Gallery, within the scope and meaning of that part of the codicil bearing date April...
Page 14 - ... property now habitually occurring among us from this one cause, become nothing less than criminal. It has been argued by some that so far in our national development the total gain to national wealth, arising from the permissible construction of buildings below the desirable standard of fire-resistance (thus enabling men with limited capital to engage in business operations without undue expenditure on property), has been greater than if too restrictive building laws had been operative. There...
Page 89 - ... twenty or twenty-five years. Sap shingles, which are almost valueless in their natural state, can easily be treated and made to outlast even painted shingles of the most decay-resistant woods. Thousands of dollars are lost every year by the so-called "bluing" of freshly sawed sapwood lumber. This can be prevented by proper treatment, and at a cost so small as to put it within the reach of the smallest operator. In the South the cheap and abundant loblolly pine, one of the easiest of all woods...
Page 211 - Saint-Gaudens' peculiar quality that, without abating one jot of the truthfulness of portrayal of the man's outside aspect, yet makes that outside aspect of little weight because of what is shown of the soul within. We look at Saint-Gaudens' mighty statue of the mighty Lincoln, and we are stirred to awe and wonder and devotion for the great man who, in strength and sorrow, bore the people's burdens through the four years of our direst need, and then, standing as high priest between the horns of the...
Page 14 - ... reasonably be possible here, viz. : the larger use of noncombustible materials, due to the higher cost of wood ; better building codes, in letter and practice; the lower height and smaller areas involved in city construction ; and finally, the intangible influence of older civilizations, which makes people more careful of small savings in all their affairs and generally more cautious than we have yet become. Allowing duly for these fundamental differences between the countries compared, it is...
Page 210 - Augustus Saint-Gaudens was a very great sculptor. This makes all the world his debtor, but in a peculiar sense it makes his countrymen his debtors. In any nation those citizens who possess the pride in their nationality, without which they cannot claim to be good citizens, must feel a particular satisfaction in the deeds of every man who adds to the sum of worthy national achievement. The great nations of antiquity, of the middle ages, and of modern times, were and are great in each several case,...

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