James Knox Polk, and a history of his administration: embracing the annexation of Texas, the difficulties with Mexico, the settlement of the Oregon question, and other important events

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J. E. Beardsley, 1850 - United States - 395 pages
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Page 175 - ... Powers: it being well understood, that this agreement is not to be construed to the prejudice of any claim, which either of the two high contracting parties may have 'to any part of the said country, nor shall it be taken to affect the claims of any other Power or State to any part of the said country ; the only object of the high contracting parties, in that respect, being to prevent disputes and differences amongst themselves.
Page 347 - It is contended on the one side that as the National Government is a government of limited powers it has no right to expend money except in the performance of acts authorized by the other specific grants according to a strict construction of their powers...
Page 147 - Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion, religious or political; peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none; the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns and the surest bulwarks against antirepublican tendencies; the preservation of the General Government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home and safety abroad...
Page 106 - ... the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns, and the surest bulwarks against anti-republican tendencies; the preservation of the general government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet-anchor of our peace at home and safety abroad...
Page 381 - The war has not been waged with a view to conquest ; but having been commenced by Mexico, it has been carried into the enemy,s country, and will be vigorously prosecuted there, with a view to obtain an honorable peace, and thereby secure ample indemnity for the expenses of the war, as well as to our much-injured citizens, who hold large pecuniary demands against Mexico.
Page 136 - That the Federal Government is one of limited powers, derived solely from the Constitution, and the grants of power shown therein, ought to be strictly construed by all the departments and agents of the government, and that it is inexpedient and dangerous to exercise doubtful constitutional powers.
Page 237 - Republic ; and shall also retain all the. vacant and unappropriated lands lying within its limits, to be applied to the payment of the debts and liabilities of said Republic of Texas ; and the residue of said lands, after discharging said debts and liabilities, to be disposed of as said State may direct ; but in no event are said debts and liabilities to become a charge upon the Government of the United States.
Page 27 - ... 4. Resolved, that as we now acknowledge the existence and control of no law or legal officer, civil or military, within this county, we do hereby ordain and adopt as a rule of life all, each and every of our former laws — wherein nevertheless the Crown of Great Britain never can be considered as holding rights, privileges, immunities, or authority therein.
Page 390 - An act to provide for the better organization of the treasury, and for the collection, safe-keeping, transfer, and disbursement of the public revenue...
Page 184 - Existing rights of every European nation should be respected, but it is due alike to our safety and our interests that the efficient protection of our laws should be extended over our whole territorial limits, and that it should be distinctly announced to the world as our settled policy that no future European colony or dominion shall with our consent be planted or established on any part of the North American continent.

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