The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Mar 13, 2012 - Psychology - 384 pages

New York Times Bestseller
 
In this “landmark contribution to humanity’s understanding of itself” (The New York Times Book Review) social psychologist Jonathan Haidt challenges conventional thinking about morality, politics, and religion in a way that speaks to conservatives and liberals alike. 
 
Drawing on his twenty five years of groundbreaking research on moral psychology, Haidt shows how moral judgments arise not from reason but from gut feelings. He shows why liberals, conservatives, and libertarians have such different intuitions about right and wrong, and he shows why each side is actually right about many of its central concerns. In this subtle yet accessible book, Haidt gives you the key to understanding the miracle of human cooperation, as well as the curse of our eternal divisions and conflicts. If you’re ready to trade in anger for understanding, read The Righteous Mind.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - drbrand - LibraryThing

The points are all very well made. The Social Intuitionist Model is convincing and useful in understanding how ineffectual reason can be in a moral argument, but it would have been interesting to see ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DerekCaelin - LibraryThing

Really thought provoking. Made me understand a little better how people think on the opposite sides of the spectrum, and how compelling moral arguments get made. (It's not just facts.) Read full review

Contents

Theres More to Morality than Harm and Fairness
93
Morality Binds and Blinds
187
Conclusion
315
Notes
323

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About the author (2012)

Jonathan Haidt is the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University's Stern School of Business. He is the author of The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom. He lives in New York City.

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