Memoir on the Language and Habitants of Lord Norths̓ Island ...

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Metcalf, Printers, 1845 - Ethnology - 247 pages
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Page 212 - These regions, said one of their most gifted writers, present, in every quarter, scenes fitted to move the most frigid imagination. Many nations are here found in their earliest infancy. The amplest openings have been afforded for commercial activity. Numberless valuable productions have been already laid under contribution to our insatiable luxury. Here many natural treasures still remain concealed from scientific observation.
Page 220 - They are excessively fond of trinkets. It would cause a fashionable lady of America to smile, to observe the pains taken by those simple daughters of nature to set off their persons. In their ears they wear a sort of ornament made of a peculiar kind of grass, which they work into a tassel ; this is painted and richly perfumed. In their noses they wear a stem of the kabooa leaf, which answers the double purpose of an ornament and a smelling-bottle...
Page 205 - The Latitude of the Cambridge Observatory, in Massachusetts, determined from Transits of Stars over the Prime Vertical, observed during the months of December, 1844, and January, 1846, by William C.
Page 213 - ... determined to mark them with some peculiar character inconsistent with those rules she had adopted in the formation of all her other productions. That form, for instance, which in other parts of the world she has confined to the smallest races of quadrupeds — the rats and the dormice — is here bestowed upon the Kangaroos, the largest tribe of four-footed animals yet discovered...
Page 212 - These regions present in every quarter scenes fitted to move the most frigid imagination. Many nations are here found in their earliest infancy. The amplest openings have been afforded for commercial activity. Numberless valuable productions have been already laid under contribution to our insatiable luxury. Here many natural treasures still remain concealed from scientific observation. How numerous are the gulfs, the ports, the straits, the lofty mountains, and the smiling plains ! What magnificence,...
Page 224 - The complexion of these islanders is a light copper color ; much lighter than the Malays, or the Pelew islanders ; which last, however, they resemble in the breadth of their faces, high cheek • bones, and broad flattened noses. They do not color their teeth, by chewing any thing, as many of those islanders do ; but their teeth are so strong that they can husk a cocoa-nut with them instantly. Their principal food is the cocoa-nut. They occasionally...
Page 219 - They were entirely naked. Each one was armed with a spear and tomahawk ; some had battle-axes. They were fantastically tattooed on different parts of their bodies. Their hair, naturally coarse and black, like that of the Indians of America, was very long, and hung loosely over their shoulders, giving them a singular and frightful appearance. Their teeth were entirely black ; rendered so, as we afterwards found, by chewing what they call
Page 205 - Memoirs of the American Academy contains an interesting paper of a kindred character, one of his latest productions, on the Language and Inhabitants of Lord North's Island, in the Indian Archipelago, with a Vocabulary. The Address before the American Oriental Society...
Page 213 - ... such as derive their principal support from sucking the nectar of flowers. This peculiar organisation, restricted, in Africa, India, and America...
Page 228 - ... some way of enabling us to join them. They were in sight about three hours ; at one time they were so near that we could distinctly see the hands on board ; but judge of our feelings when we saw the vessel pursuing her course ! Our expectations were all blasted in a moment, and our minds, which had been gladdened by the hope of once more enjoying the society of civilized beings, of once more reaching the shores of our beloved country, sunk back into a state of despair ; we wept like children.

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