The American Pietism of Cotton Mather: Origins of American Evangelicalism

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Wipf and Stock Publishers, Sep 1, 2007 - Religion - 360 pages
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Cotton Mather is probably best known for his contributions to the Puritanism of colonial America. Yet the subject of this book is Mather's theology of Christian experience, usually associated with continental Pietism, a dynamic movement of reform and renewal in the Lutheran church. Richard Lovelace summarizes the basic thrust of Mather's treatment of spiritual rebirth, sanctification, pastoral and social ministry, the need for spiritual awakening, and the effects he believed this awakening should produce in Christianity and the mission of the church.

In Mather, the two great strains of American Evangelical Protestantism--Puritanism and Pietism--were combined, influencing Jonathan Edwards and American religion in general throughout the Great Awakening and subsequent revivals. Thus, the book is unique in tracing the roots of modern Evangelicalism beyond nineteenth-century Arminianism to the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century blend of Puritant-Pietist thought.
 

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Contents

The Sources and Structure of Mathers
32
The Experience of Rebirth
73
The Machinery of Piety
110
The Godly Life
146
CHAPTER SIX T he Mnistry of Doing Good
198
The Unity of the Godly
251
Epilogue
282
Notes
305
Index
343
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About the author (2007)

Richard F. Lovelace is Professor Emeritus at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in Massachusetts.

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