Making the Chinese Mexican: Global Migration, Localism, and Exclusion in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

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Stanford University Press, Apr 15, 2013 - History - 320 pages
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Making the Chinese Mexican is the first book to examine the Chinese diaspora in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. It presents a fresh perspective on immigration, nationalism, and racism through the experiences of Chinese migrants in the region during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Navigating the interlocking global and local systems of migration that underlay Chinese borderlands communities, the author situates the often-paradoxical existence of these communities within the turbulence of exclusionary nationalisms.

The world of Chinese fronterizos (borderlanders) was shaped by the convergence of trans-Pacific networks and local arrangements, against a backdrop of national unrest in Mexico and in the era of exclusionary immigration policies in the United States, Chinese fronterizos carved out vibrant, enduring communities that provided a buffer against virulent Sinophobia. This book challenges us to reexamine the complexities of nation making, identity formation, and the meaning of citizenship. It represents an essential contribution to our understanding of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands.

 

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Contents

Nations Borders and History
1
Chinese Migration Networks into the Americas
13
Chinese and Mexican Relationships in Everyday Meaning
41
Border Crossers and Alien Smugglers
73
4 The First AntiChinese Campaign in the Time of Revolution
104
Sinophobia and the Rise of Postrevolutionary Mexican Nationalism
157
Epilogue
190
Abbreviations
201
Notes
205
Glossary of Chinese Names and Terms
265
Bibliography
267
Index
297
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About the author (2013)

Grace Peña Delgado is Assistant Professor of History at The Pennsylvania State University.

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