Magic in the Middle Ages

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Cambridge University Press, May 1, 2000 - History - 219 pages
28 Reviews
How was magic practised in medieval times? How did it relate to the diverse beliefs and practices that characterised this fascinating period? In Magic in the Middle Ages Richard Kieckhefer surveys the growth and development of magic in medieval times. He examines its relation to religion, science, philosophy, art, literature and politics before introducing us to the different types of magic that were used, the kinds of people who practised magic, and the reasoning behind their beliefs. In addition, he shows how magic served as a point of contact between the popular and elite classes, how the reality of magical beliefs is reflected in the fiction of medieval literature, and how the persecution of magic and witchcraft led to changes in the law. This 2000 book places magic at the crossroads of medieval culture, shedding light on many other aspects of life in the middle ages.
 

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Review: Magic in the Middle Ages

User Review  - Tchipakkan - Goodreads

This is one of my favorite books on the subject. Read full review

Review: Magic in the Middle Ages

User Review  - Julie Winchester - Goodreads

I found some of the perspectives creakier than some newer summary secondary-literature books on magic history, but regardless it's a very solid work with lots of good examples. It's still the best overall treatment of its topic. Read full review

Contents

IV
1
V
2
VI
8
VII
17
VIII
19
IX
21
X
29
XI
33
XXVIII
100
XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XIX
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XXI
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XXXVI
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XLVI
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XLVIII
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L
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