A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings

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Penguin, 2010 - Fiction - 288 pages
17 Reviews

Part of Penguin's beautiful hardback Clothbound Classics series, designed by the award-winning Coralie Bickford-Smith, these delectable and collectible editions are bound in high-quality colourful, tactile cloth with foil stamped into the design.

After reading Christmas Carol, the notoriously reculsive Thomas Carlyle was "seized with a perfect convulsion of hospitality" and threw not one but two Christmas dinner parties. The impact of the story may not always have been so dramatic but, along with Dickens other Christmas writings, it has had a lasting and significant influence upon our ideas about the Christmas spirit, and about the season as a time for celebration, charity, and memory.

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Review: A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings

User Review  - Allison Dunlap - Goodreads

It was high time to read A Christmas Carol rather than watch the movie versions. I must confess I couldn't make heads or tails of some of his other stories. What I gained from reading ACC that I never ... Read full review

Review: A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings

User Review  - Branwen Sedai *of the White Ajah* - Goodreads

"I have always thought of Christmas time as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time; the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely." Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Charles Dickenswas born in Portsmouth on 7 February 1812, the second of eight children. Dickens's childhood experiences were similar to those depicted in David Copperfield. His father, who was a government clerk, was imprisoned for debt and Dickens was briefly sent to work in a blacking warehouse at the age of twelve. He received little formal education, but taught himself shorthand and became a reporter of parliamentary debates for the Morning Chronicle. He began to publish sketches in various periodicals, which were subsequently republished as Sketches by Boz. The Pickwick Paperswas published in 1836-7, after a slow start it became a publishing phenomenon and Dickens's characters the centre of a popular cult. Part of the secret of his success was the method of cheap serial publication he adopted; thereafter, all Dickens's novels were first published in serial form. He began Oliver Twistin 1837, followed by Nicholas Nickleby(1838) and The Old Curiosity Shop(1840-41). After finishing Barnaby Rudge(1841) Dickens set off for America; he went full of enthusiasm for the young republic but, in spite of a triumphant reception, he returned disillusioned. His experiences are recorded in American Notes(1842). A Christmas Carol, the first of the hugely popular Christmas Books, appeared in 1843, while

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