History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent: The American Revolution. Vol VI IX.

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Little, Brown & C, 1860
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Contents

arms 61Divisions of the army 61Washingtons measures to obtain a lit
66
His difficulties and wants 68His fortitude
70
Provides for defence 72Lord Stirling 72Pennsylvania 72Willing
76
tion suspended 82Declaration of the convention 82Spirit of Jefferson
82
Danger from the savages 87Stuart the Indian agent 87Gage and
90
Martins opinion 91Confidence of Lord William Campbell 91Spirit
96
verian troops taken into British pay 101The senate of Hamburg befriend
102
of her first minister 105Alexis Orloff 106Potemkin 106Indifference
109
Remonstrance of the committee of Philadelphia 114Congress uncertain
115
Historic candor and love of truth 116Ilistory must not hide faults
116
likely to speak ill of princes than men of rank 122Americans discriminate
122
Question raised on Parliamentary reform 125Townshend conforms to Rock
129
134Reception of the proclamation in America 134Opinion of the wife
134
John Adams 135Massachusetts institutes an admiralty court 136Opin
141
Beaumarchais in London 146Hastens to Paris 146His memorial to
147
Gunning argues the case at large to Panin 152He offers to take fifteen
156
War to be transferred to New York 158Expedition against the southern colo
159
ty of Oxford 163Lord Stormont and the king of France 163Stormont
166
Adam Smith 173Of Josiah Tucker 174Of Soame Jenyns 174The
175
barks for St Johns 181Schuyler retreats 181His letter to congress
182
He is put in irons and sent to England 184Montgomery in want of good
189
Their progress 183Enos deserts 193They reach the portage 194Their
197
He summons Carleton to surrender the city 202His batteries 202Carle
203
The death of himself and others 208Campbell orders a retreat 208Arnold
210
A sally 210The party surrender 210Loss of the Americans 210Mac
211
Dumas 216De Bonvouloir arrives in Philadelphia 216His interview with
217
John Johnson 272The capitulation 273Schuyler refuses the command
274
Arrival of Clinton and Lee 279Many inhabitants leave the city 279Hos
280
Message between the two chiefs 285Advance of Caswell 285Macdonald
289
Dorchester Heights 292Washington prepares to occupy them 292Rufus
296
Ministry unprepared for his retreat 300Joseph Brant the Mohawk
304
His vanity 309His envy 309His courage 310His religious creed 210
312
character 314His resolution is received for consideration 314Joseph Reed
317
Philadelphia propose a convention 323Opposition 323The call suspend
326
by England 332May be the basis of a coalition ministry 332Professing
340
tocracy 341Intrigues of Turgots enemies 341Sartine agrees with
342
dered to Sullivans Island 346New issue of paper money 347Hesitation
348
North Carolina 352It votes an explicit sanction of independence 352 South
354
variance with herself 359Sandwich for absolute authority 360Concil
362
304Conservatism 365The pride of unbelief 365Humes philosophy
366
people
372
Politics of Virginia 375The Lees 375The family of Cary 375Unan
378
THE VIRGINIA PROPOSITION OF INDEPENDENCE May June 1776
384
for it 388Uneasiness of the assembly 388Report of new instructions
388
CHAPTER LXVI
394
North Carolina regiments 398Orders of Lee 398Armstrong at Haddrells
400
the action 404Moultrie fires slowly 404Sends for powder 405Clin
409
CHAPTER LXVII
415
416Insurmountable obstacles 417The Canadian clergy 417The
416
Wooster before Quebec 420His batteries 420Incompleteness of the regi
424
Attempt on Three Rivers 429Gallantry of Wayne 430Expedition
433
Its firmness 439Its votes 439The people consulted 439Unanimity
440

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Page 464 - Determined to keep open a market where MEN should be bought and sold, he has prostituted his negative for suppressing every legislative attempt to prohibit or to restrain this execrable commerce. And that this assemblage of horrors might want no fact of distinguished...
Page 469 - In every stage of these oppressions we have petitioned for redress in the most humble terms. Our repeated petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.
Page 378 - That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence ; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience ; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love and charity towards each other.
Page 458 - The second * day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epocha in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to' be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forevermore.
Page 379 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity ; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 380 - That elections of members to serve as representatives of the people, in assembly, ought to be free; and that all men, having sufficient evidence of permanent common interest with, and attachment to, the community, have the right of suffrage, and cannot be taxed or deprived of their property for public uses without their own consent, or that of their representatives so elected, nor bound by any law to which they have not, in like manner, assented, for the public good.
Page 467 - He has refused, for a long time after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the legislative powers, incapable of annihilation, have returned to the people at large for their exercise ; the State remaining, in the mean time, exposed to all the danger of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
Page 162 - England will ere long repent of having removed the only check that could keep her colonies in awe. They stand no longer in need of her protection ; she will call on them to contribute towards supporting the burdens they have helped to bring on her ; and they will answer by striking off all dependence.
Page 239 - O! ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose not only the tyranny but the tyrant, stand forth ! Every spot of the old world is overrun with oppression. Freedom hath been hunted round the Globe. Asia and Africa have long expelled her. Europe regards her like a stranger, and England hath given her warning to depart. O! receive the fugitive, and prepare in time an asylum for mankind.
Page 235 - Tis not the affair of a city, a county, a province, or a kingdom, but of a continent — of at least one eighth part of the habitable globe. 'Tis not the concern of a day, a year, or an age ; posterity are virtually involved in the contest, and will be more or less affected, even to the end of time, by the proceedings now.

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