The Coaching Pocketbook

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Management Pocketbooks, 2004 - Mentoring in business - 112 pages
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Coaching is aimed at improving performance at work. This is done by turning the activities people do into learning situations, in a planned way and under guidance. The Coaching Pocketbook defines the coach's role and explains how coaching differs from the other 'helping skills' of advising, instructing, counselling and mentoring. There are four key stages to coaching, namely assessing current performance levels, setting outcomes for learning, agreeing tactics/initiating action, and giving feedback. The author explains each stage and then moves on to summarise the various skills required. Next, the opportunities for coaching and the potential pitfalls are highlighted. A checklist and a case study end the Pocketbook on a practical note. 'Encapsulated my belief in the potential of people and showed me how to translate this into appropriate action', commented one reader.

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About the author (2004)

Ian Lancaster Fleming was born on May 28, 1908, in London, England. He attended Eton College and then the Royal Military College at Sandhurst. He left there after a year to go study languages in Munich and Geneva. Fleming served as the Moscow correspondent for the Reuters News Agency from 1929 till 1933. he then became a banker and a stockholder in London until the beginning of World War II. When the war began, Fleming became the personal assistant to the Director of British Naval Intelligence, where he learned most of his espionage terms. When the war was over, he worked as the foreign manager of The Sunday Times in London. Fleming wrote twelve James Bond novels, nearly all of which were made into Motion Pictures. His works included: Casino Royale, Live and Let Die, Moonraker, Diamonds Are Forever, Dr. No, Goldfinger, Thunderball, Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang, and For Your eyes Only. He of died of a heart attack on August 12, 1964.

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