Women's Activism and Social Change: Rochester, New York, 1822-1872

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Lexington Books, 2002 - Social Science - 283 pages
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Women's Activism and Social Change challenges the popular belief that the lives of antebellum women focused on their role in the private sphere of the family. Examining intense and well-documented reform movements in nineteenth-century Rochester, New York, Nancy Hewitt distinguishes three networks of women's activism: women from the wealthiest Rochester families who sought to ameliorate the lives of the poor; those from upwardly mobile families who, influenced by evangelical revivalism, campaigned to eradicate such social ills as slavery, vice, and intemperance; and those who combined limited economic resources with an agrarian Quaker tradition of communalism and religious democracy to advocate full racial and sexual equality.
 

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Contents

Material and Moral Progress
24
A Profusion of Pathways
38
From Amelioration to Perfection
69
Moral Crusades and Ultraist Alternatives
97
Coalitions and Confrontations
139
Union or Liberty
177
Never Another Season of Silence
216
Tables
259
Index
275
About the Author
283
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Page 2 - The Cult of True Womanhood: 1820-1860," American Quarterly 18 (1966): 151-74; Nancy F.

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About the author (2002)

Nancy A. Hewitt is Professor of History and Women's Studies at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

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