Mythologies and Philosophies of Salvation in the Theistic Traditions of India

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Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press, Dec 11, 1984 - Philosophy - 549 pages

Based on exhaustive reference to primary source material, this volume explores the relationships between religious mythologies and religious philosophical system within the theistic traditions in India. Not content merely to explore these relationships, the author further examines the relevance of mythology and philosophy in a discussion of salvation--salvation understood in its sociological, eschatological, and philosophical senses. The treatment of myth and philosophy is comprehensive in scope, pulling together a great variety of sources and commentary, and illuminating them for the Western reader.

This study will be of interest both to students of Indian religions and to students of comparative religion interested in creating a context for the discussion of Eastern and Western religions.

 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
Salvation in Vedic Religion
6
Visnu as Saviour
56
Main Elements and Sources of 346aivism
122
Dev299 as Saviour
192
Synthesis and Conclusion
235
KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS USED IN NOTES
285
NOTES
287
BIBLIOGRAPHY
446
INDEX
477
PLATES
501
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Page 10 - The Rishis arranged the substance of their thought in a system of parallelism by which the same deities were at once internal and external Powers of universal Nature, and they managed its expression through a system of double values by which the same language served for their worship in both aspects. But the psychological sense predominates and is more pervading, close-knit and coherent than the physical.
Page 6 - Even at this day all the obligatory duties of the Hindus at birth, marriage, death, etc., are performed according to the old Vedic ritual. The prayers that a Brahmin now says three times a day are the same selections of Vedic verses as were used as prayer verses two or three thousand years ago. A little insight into the life of an ordinary Hindu of the present day will show that the system of image-worship is one that has been grafted upon his life, the regular obligatory duties of which are ordered...
Page 6 - Hindu philosophy not only own their allegiance to the Vedas, but the adherents of each one of them would often quarrel with others and maintain its superiority by trying to prove that it and it alone was the faithful follower of the Vedas and represented correctly their views. The laws which regulate the social, legal, domestic and religious customs and rites of the Hindus even to the present day are said to be but mere systematized memories of old Vedic teachings, and are held to be obligatory on...

About the author (1984)

Klaus Klostermaier teaches in the Department of religion at the University of Manitoba.

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