After Our Likeness: The Church as the Image of the Trinity

Front Cover
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1998 - Religion - 314 pages
In After Our Likeness, the inaugural volume in the Sacra Doctrina series, Miroslav Volf explores the relationship between persons and community in Christian theology. The focus is the community of grace, the Christian church. The point of departure is the thought of the first Baptist, John Smyth, and the notion of church as "gathered community" that he shared with Radical Reformers.

Volf seeks to counter the tendencies toward individualism in Protestant ecclesiology and to suggest a viable understanding of the church in which both person and community are given their proper due. In the process he engages in a sustained and critical ecumenical dialogue with the Catholic and Orthodox ecclesiologies of Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger and the metropolitan John Zizioulas. The result is a brilliant ecumenical study that spells out a vision of the church as an image of the triune God.
 

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Contents

Faith Person and Church
159
1 Faith and the Church
160
12 Individualism of Faith?
168
2 The Ecclesial Character of Salvation
172
22 The Genesis of a Concrete Church
175
3 Personhood in the Ecclesial Community
181
32 Person in the Communion of the Spirit
185
Trinity and Church
191

6 Trinitarian and Ecclesial Communion
67
Zizioulas Communion One and Many
73
1 The Ontology of Person
75
11 Trinitarian Personhood
76
12 Human Personhood
81
2 Ecclesial Personhood
83
Person and Community
84
22 Baptism
88
23 Truth
91
3 Ecclesial Communion
97
32 Community and Communities
103
4 The Structure of the Communion
107
41 Institution and Event
108
42 Bishop
109
43 Laity
113
44 Apostolicity and Conciliarity
117
The Ecclesiality of the Church
127
1 Identity and Identification of the Church
128
12 Where is the Church?
130
2 We Are the Church
135
21 The Church as Assembly
137
22 The Church and the Confession of Faith
145
3 Church and Churches
154
11 Correspondences
192
12 The Limits of Analogy
198
2 Trinity Universal Church and Local Church
200
3 Trinitarian Persons and the Church
204
32 Perichoretic Personhood
208
4 The Structure of Trinitarian and Ecclesial Relations
214
Structures of the Church
221
1 Charismata and Participation
222
11 Bishop or Everyone?
223
12 The Charismatic Church
228
2 The Trinity and Ecclesial Institutions
234
22 Spirit Institutions and the Mediation of Salvation
239
3 Ordination
245
31 Office and Ordination
246
32 Ordination and Election
252
The Catholicity of the Church
259
2 Catholicity and New Creation
264
3 The Catholicity of the Local Church
270
32 Catholicity and Creation
276
4 The Catholicity of Person
278
Bibliography
283
Index
307
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Miroslav Volf is the Henry B. Wright Professor of Theology at Yale Divinity School and Director of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture. He has published and edited nine books and over 60 scholarly articles, including his book Exclusion and Embrace, which won the 2002 Grawemeyer Award in Religion. Professor Volf is the founding Director of the Yale Center for Faith and Culture. His books include Allah: A Christian Response (2011); Free of Charge: Giving and Forgiving in a Culture Stripped of Grace (2006), which was the Archbishop of Canterbury Lenten book for 2006; Exclusion and Embrace: A Theological Exploration of Identity, Otherness, and Reconciliation (1996), a winner of the 2002 Grawemeyer Award; and After Our Likeness: The Church as the Image of the Trinity (1998), winner of the Christianity Today book award. A member of the Episcopal Church in the U.S.A. and the Evangelical Church in Croatia, Professor Volf has been involved in international ecumenical dialogues (for instance, with the Vatican¿s Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity) and interfaith dialogues (on the executive board of C-1 World Dialogue), and is active participant in the Global Agenda Council on Values of the World Economic Forum. A native of Croatia, he regularly teaches and lectures in Central and Eastern Europe, Asia, and across North America. Professor Volf is a fellow of Berkeley College.

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