The War of the Worlds

Front Cover
Ace Books, 1988 - Fiction - 173 pages
The earth-shattering classic novel is now a nationally syndicated, first-run television series! The pilot episode, Resurrection, from Paramount will air as a two-hour movie in October, followed by 24 one-hour episodes! Don't forget to stock up on the book that made all this possible!

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User Review  - P_S_Patrick - LibraryThing

Better than his Invisible Man, but not as good as his Time Machine (which still rates as one of my top Sci Fi stories). Here the earth is invaded by Martians, and we hear the tale from the point of ... Read full review

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User Review  - ragwaine - LibraryThing

This was entertaining, though I wouldn't say brilliant, obviously ground breaking at the time. The narrator of the story wasn't as much a hero as an observer who was occasionally brave. Wells does a ... Read full review

Contents

THE COMING OF THE MARTIANS 1 The Eve of the War
7
The Falling Star
13
On Horsell Common
17
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Herbert George Wells was born in Bromley, Kent, England, on September 21, 1866. His father was a professional cricketer and sometime shopkeeper, his mother a former lady's maid. Although "Bertie" left school at fourteen to become a draper's apprentice (a life he detested), he later won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in London, where he studied with the famous Thomas Henry Huxley. He began to sell articles and short stories regularly in 1893. In 1895, his immediately successful novel rescued him from a life of penury on a schoolteacher's salary. His other "scientific romances"--The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), The War of the Worlds (1898), The First Men in the Moon (1901), and The War in the Air (1908)--won him distinction as the father of science fiction.

Henry James saw in Wells the most gifted writer of the age, but Wells, having coined the phrase "the war that will end war" to describe World War I, became increasingly disillusioned and focused his attention on educating mankind with his bestselling Outline of History (1920) and his later utopian works. Living until 1946, Wells witnessed a world more terrible than any of his imaginative visions, and he bitterly observed: "Reality has taken a leaf from my book and set itself to supercede me."

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