Historical collections of Ohio: containing a collection of the most interesting facts, traditions, biographical sketches, anecdotes, etc., relating to its general and local history: with descriptions of its counties, principal towns and villages ; illustrated by 177 engravings

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Derby, Bradley & co., 1847 - Ohio - 581 pages
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Page 407 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it: I have killed many: I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country, I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 92 - You always told us to remain here, and take care of our lands; it made our hearts glad to hear that was your wish. Our great father, the king, is the head, and you represent him: You always told us you would never draw your foot off British ground.
Page 318 - All these orders were obeyed with spirit and promptitude ; but such was the impetuosity of the charge by the first line of infantry that the Indians and Canadian militia and volunteers were driven from all their coverts...
Page 269 - Captain Cresap, What did you kill my people on Yellow Creek for? The white people Killed my kin at Conestoga,* a great while ago; and I thought nothing of that. But you killed my kin again, on Yellow Creek, and took my cousin prisoner. Then I thought I must kill too; and I have been three times to war since: but the Indians are not angry; only myself.
Page 548 - I can judge, when at last, being almost exhausted, he lay down on his belly ; they then scalped him, and repeatedly threw the scalp in my face, telling me,
Page 92 - The Americans have not yet defeated us by land; neither are we sure that they have done so by water; we therefore wish to remain here and fight our enemy should they make their appearance. If they defeat us, we will then retreat with our father.
Page 9 - Pennsylvania, as now claimed by said Commonwealth, and from thence by a line drawn north, parallel to and one hundred and twenty miles west of the said west line of Pennsylvania, and to continue north until it comes to forty-two degrees and two minutes north latitude.
Page 507 - no colony in America was ever settled under such favorable auspices as that which was first commenced at the Muskingum. Information, property and strength, will be its characteristics. I know many of the settlers personally, and there never were men better calculated to promote the welfare of such a community.
Page 92 - Father, listen! our fleet has gone out; we know they have fought; we have heard the great guns...
Page 286 - Mormon, and, to my great surprise, I find nearly the same historical matter, names, &c., as they were in my brother's writings. I well remember that he wrote in the old style, and commenced about every sentence with,

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