Writing for Computer Science

Front Cover
Taylor & Francis, Jun 3, 2004 - Computers - 270 pages
4 Reviews
Writing for Computer Science is an introduction to doing and describing - search. For the most part the book is a discussion of good writing style and effective research strategies. Some of the material is accepted wisdom, some is controversial, and some is my opinions. Although the book is brief, it is designed to be comprehensive: some readers may be interested in exploring topics further, but for most readers this book should be suf?cient. The ?rst edition of this book was almost entirely about writing. This e- tion, partly in response to reader feedback and partly in response to issues that arose in my ownexperiences as an advisor, researcher, and referee, is also about research methods. Indeed, the two topics—writing about and doing research— are not clearly separated. It is a small step from asking how do I write? to askingwhatisitthatIwriteabout? As previously, the guidance on writing focuses on research, but much of the material is applicable to general technical and professional communication. Likewise, the guidance on the practice of research has broader lessons. A pr- titioner trying a new algorithm or explaining to colleagues why one solution is preferable to another should be con?dent that the arguments are built on robust foundations. And, while this edition has a stronger emphasis on research than did the ?rst, nothing has been deleted; there is additional material on research, but the guidance on writing has not been taken away.
 

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Review: Writing for Computer Science

User Review  - Goodreads

I had expected a book on writing user manuals, developer documentation, or similar documents. Instead, this book focuses on writing ACM-style articles and conference papers. There is material about ... Read full review

Review: Writing for Computer Science

User Review  - Max Lybbert - Goodreads

I had expected a book on writing user manuals, developer documentation, or similar documents. Instead, this book focuses on writing ACM-style articles and conference papers. There is material about ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Kinds of publication
2
Writing science and skepticism
3
Using this book
4
Spelling and terminology
6
Good style
7
Economy
8
Tone
9
Performance of algorithms
124
Asymptotic complexity
126
Editing
129
Consistency
130
Proofreading
131
Choice of wordprocessor
133
An editing checklist
134
Writing up
137

Examples
12
Motivation
13
Balance
14
The upper hand
16
Analogies
17
Straw men
18
Reference and citation
19
Quotation
24
Acknowledgements
26
Grammar
27
Style specifics
29
Titles and headings
30
The opening paragraphs
31
Variation
33
Ambiguity
34
Sentence structure
36
Tense
40
Emphasis
42
Definitions
43
Qualifiers
45
Misused words
46
Spelling conventions
50
Jargon
51
Cliché and idiom
52
Overuse of words
53
Padding
54
Plurals
56
Abbreviations
57
Sexism
58
Punctuation
59
Stops
60
Commas
61
Colons and semicolons
62
Apostrophes
63
Hyphenation
64
Quotations
65
Parentheses
66
Citations
67
Mathematics
69
Theorems
71
Readability
72
Notation
74
Ranges and sequences
75
Alphabets
76
Numbers
77
Percentages
79
Units of measurement
80
Graphs figures and tables
83
Visualization of results
93
Diagrams
99
Tables
100
Captions and labels
111
Algorithms
115
Formalisms
117
Level of detail
118
Figures
119
Notation
123
The scope of a paper
138
Telling a story
140
Organization
143
The first draft
149
From draft to submission
150
Prepublication
152
Theses
153
A writingup checklist
155
Doing research
157
Beginnings
158
Shaping a research project
159
Students and advisors
162
Finding research literature
163
Reading
165
Research planning
167
Hypotheses
169
Defending hypotheses
173
Evidence
175
Good and bad science
177
Reflections on research
180
A research checklist
182
Experimentation
185
Designing experiments
186
Measurements and coding
189
Describing experiments
191
Variables
192
Statistics
198
Intuition
203
An experimentation checklist
204
Refereeing
205
Responsibilities
206
Evaluation of papers
208
Referees reports
210
A refereeing checklist
213
Ethics
215
Plagiarism
217
Selfplagiarism
219
Misrepresentation
221
Authorship
222
Confidentiality and conflict of interest
223
An ethics checklist
224
Giving presentations
225
Content
226
Organization
228
The introduction
229
The conclusion
230
Delivery
231
Question time
233
Slides
234
Text slides
236
Figures
237
Examples of slides
238
Afterword
249
Bibliography
251
Exercises
253
Index
263
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2004)

Zobel-Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia