Reviews

Review: Afghanistan: A Military History From Alexander the Great to the Present

Editorial Review - Bookreporter.com - Timothy E

For two and a half millennia, Afghanistan has been a centerpiece for imperial ambitions. Its strategic location in Asia has made this an important crossroad for trade and conquest. Throughout the centuries the Afghanis have developed a warrior class with nearly unparalleled fighting skills and instincts. Time and again, this people has done whatever necessary to win battle after battle against ... Read full review

User reviews

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

As a soldier, I read this book before deploying to Afghanistan. This book helped me understand the Afghan people. In doing so, I fell in love with them. This is how War's are won, by understanding the people who live in a region effected by violence.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

What...
Test

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

One of my LTs at NOSC Pensacola FL. Said I should read - Afghanistan – A Military History from Alexander the Great to the War Against the Taliban by Stephen Tanner. I picked this book up months ago and put it high on my reading list. I know so little about this area and this is not a good state to be in when your country is at war. We, as responsible Americans, should educate ourselves as much as we can about our foreign affairs.
The History of Afghanistan is both amazing and sad. The book paints a picture of a people and land that just never could get on the right path. There are many examples of great things that happened in this country, but they never really stick to a good thing. The land has also been attacked in nearly every century. Add the attacks to the tribal in fighting and there is no good outcome.
The final 5 chapters – The Soviets, The Mujahideen, The Rise of the Taliban, The Americans and Pashtunistan are, in my opinion, the best of the book. If you only read these 5 chapters it is worth getting the book (I hope you read all the book). The Pashtunistan chapter really helps seal the understanding that this is a complex issue and not going to be solved anytime in the near future.
Ahmed Shah Massoud was introduced in the chapter titled The Mujahideen and his life ends in the last paragraph of The Rise of the Taliban. Massoud, also pictured on the front of the book, was killed by the Taliban Sep. 10, 2001 – the day before the Twin Towers were attacked. It is too bad that he was killed; he was a great man for his country and could have done a lot to stabilize the region after the US pushed back the Taliban.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

hai sir iam ur big fan my name is 4rajkumar

All reviews - 5
2 stars - 0
1 star - 0

All reviews - 5

All reviews - 5