Report of the Chief of Ordnance to the Secretary of War

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1884
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Page 21 - ... palladium of our security and the first effectual resort in case of hostility. It is essential, therefore, that the same system should pervade the whole ; that the formation and discipline of the militia of the continent should be absolutely uniform, and that the same species of arms, accoutrements, and military apparatus should be introduced in every part of the United States. No one who has not learned it from experience can conceive the difficulty, expense, and confusion which result from...
Page 6 - Board" appointed in accordance with the act of Congress approved March 3, 1883 : "For tlio purpose of examining and reporting to Congress which of the navy-yards or arsenals owned by the Government has the best location and is best adapted for the establishment of a Government, foundry, or what other method, if any, should be adopted for the manufacture of heavy ordnance adapted to modern warfare, for the use of the Army and Navy of the United States, the cost of all buildings, tools, and implements...
Page 15 - States, shall be publicly subjected to the proper test, including such rapid firing as a like gun would be likely to be subjected to in actual battle, for the determination of the endurance of the same...
Page 508 - SIR: In accordance with your instructions I have the honor to submit the following report of...
Page 21 - Congress will recommend a proper peace establishment for the United States, in which a due attention will be paid to the importance of placing the militia of the Union upon a regular and respectable footing. If this should be the case, I would beg leave to urge the great advantage of it in the strongest terms. The militia of this country must be considered as the palladium of our security, and the first effectual resort in case of hostility. It is essential, therefore, that the same system should...
Page 140 - Bauge check (Plate 1 Fig. 1) is composed of a breech-screw with an interrupted thread, traversed in the direction of its axis by a spindle terminating in a head shaped like a mushroom. The head receives the pressure of the powder gases and is supported by a plastic material interposed between it and the face of the breech -screw; the plastic material effects the obturation. The plastic substance employed is composed of asbestos and tallow contained in an envelope of cloth and sustained by two cup-shaped...
Page 462 - .505. Sectional area, .20 square inch. Gauged length, 2". General summary. OS. 5Ш 54.000 Tensile strength per square inch of original section pounds. Elastic limit per square inch of original section do . . Elongation per inch after rupture inch . Elongation per inch under strain at elastic limit do. . Reduction in diameter at point of rupture do.. Reduction in area after rupture, percent of original section 37.1 Position of rupture 1".
Page 445 - It was placed in a regenerative gas-heating furnace with doors at both ends. A piece of iron pipe was inserted in the central hole at each end and projected some inches beyond the doors, which were bricked up about the pipes. An inch steam-pipe was conducted to one of these pipes, by means of which a jet of steam could be thrown in and a strong current of cold air produced through the bore of the cylinder. The temperature was raised gradually, the flame being directed alternately above and below...
Page 81 - The foundation is already laid, and it is expected that the building will be completed and ready for occupancy by the 1st of December, 1872.
Page 6 - Congress which of the navy-yards or arsenals owned by the Government has the best location and is best adapted for the establishment of a Government foundry ; or what other method, if any, should be adopted for the manufacture of heavy ordnance adapted to modern warfare, for the use of the Army and Navy of the United States ; the cost of all buildings, tools, and implements necessary to be used in the manufacture thereof, including the cost of a steam-hammer or apparatus of sufficient size for the...

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