Utilitarianism

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Cosimo, Inc., Oct 1, 2008 - Philosophy - 68 pages
Is there a basis for morality and human freedom independent of religious dogma? This great question, which still perplexes us today, was passionately explored by John Stuart Mill in the mid 19th century... and the answers Mill found continue to intrigue. One of Mills most influential essays, 1861s Utilitarianism is essential reading for anyone hoping to understand modern ethics, concepts of justice, and personal philosophy. In casual but powerful language, Mill explains the simple yet profound idea that maximizing human happiness, on both a personal and societal scale, must be the ultimate goal of all our thoughts and acts. How do we define happiness, and how do we put this scheme into motion? Mill examines these questions and others in one of the most provocative examinations of human motivations ever written. English philosopher and politician JOHN STUART MILL (18061873) was one of the foremost figure of Western intellectual thought in the late 19th century. He served as an administrator in the East Indian Company from 1823 to 1858, and as a member of parliament from 1865 to 1868. Among his essays on a wide range of political and social thought are Principles of Political Economy (1848), Considerations on Representative Government (1861), and The Subjection of Women (1869).
 

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Contents

GENERAL REMARKS
1
WHAT UTILITARIANISM IS
5
OF THE ULTIMATE SANCTION OF THE PRINCIPLE OF UTILITY
23
OF WHAT SORT OF PROOF THE PRINCIPLE OF UTILITY IS SUSCEPTIBLE
30
ON THE CONNEXION BETWEEN JUSTICE AND UTILITY
35
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John Stuart Mill, Classical economist, was born in 1806. His father was the Ricardian economist, James Mill. John Stuart Mill's writings on economics and philosophy were prodigious. His "Principles of Political Economy, With Some of Their Applications to Social Philosophy," published in 1848, was the leading economics textbook of the English-speaking world during the second half of the 19th century. Some of Mill's other works include "Considerations on Representative Government," "Auguste Comte and Positivism," "The Subjection of Women," and "Three Essays on Religion." John Mill died in 1873.

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