The Dramatic Works of the Right Honourable Richard Brinsley Sheridan

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George Gabriel Sigmond
H.G. Bohn, 1857 - Sheridan - 563 pages
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Page 232 - I'll tell you what, Jack — I mean, you dog — if you don't, by Capt. A. What, Sir, promise to link myself to some mass of ugliness ; to Sir A. Zounds ! sirrah ! the lady shall be as ugly as I choose : she shall have a hump on each shoulder ; she shall be as crooked as the crescent ; her one eye shall roll like the bull's in Cox's museum ; she shall have a skin like a mummy, and the beard of a Jew — She shall be all this, sirrah ! yet I'll make you ogle her all day, and sit up all night, to write...
Page 388 - Ay, and when my cousin Sophy -has called you a stiff, peevish old bachelor, and laughed at me for thinking of marrying one who might be my father, I have always defended you, and said I didn't think you so ugly, by any means. Sir P. Thank you. Lady T. And I dared say you'd make a very good sort of a husband.
Page 218 - You thought, miss ! I don't know any business you have to think at all — thought does not become a young woman. But the point we would request of you is, that you will promise to forget this fellow — to illiterate him, I say, quite from your memory.
Page 369 - We lift a little going to church, and came to a quarrel before the bells had done ringing. I was more than once nearly choked with gall during the honeymoon, and had lost all comfort in life before my friends had done wishing me joy.
Page 395 - I take to be a prudent old fellow, who has got money to lend. I am blockhead enough to give fifty per cent, sooner than not have it! and you, I presume, are rogue enough to take a hundred if you can get it. Now, sir, you see we are acquainted at once, and may proceed to business without further ceremony.
Page 241 - It is but too true, indeed, ma'am; — yet I fear our ladies should share the blame — they think our admiration of beauty so great, that knowledge in them would be superfluous. Thus, like garden-trees, they seldom show fruit, till time has robbed them of the more specious blossom. — Few, like Mrs. Malaprop and the orange-tree, are rich in both at once!
Page 281 - Come, now, I hope there is no dissatisfied person, but what is content; for as I have been disappointed myself, it will be very hard if I have not the satisfaction of seeing other people succeed better.
Page 407 - So, so; then I perceive your prescription is, that I must sin in my own defence, and part with my virtue to preserve my reputation?
Page 373 - ... should have a character but themselves! Such a crew! Ah! many a wretch has rid on a hurdle who has done less mischief than these utterers of forged tales, coiners of scandal, and clippers of reputation.
Page 230 - I did not expect it, for I was going to write to you on a little matter of business. — Jack, I have been considering that I grow old and infirm, and shall probably not trouble you long.

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