Wittgenstein's Metaphysics

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 28, 1994 - Philosophy - 350 pages
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Wittgenstein's Metaphysics offers a radical new interpretation of the fundamental ideas of Ludwig Wittgenstein. It takes issue with the conventional view that after 1930 Wittgenstein rejected the philosophy of the Tractatus and developed a wholly new conception of philosophy. By tracing the evolution of Wittgenstein's ideas, Cook shows that they are neither as original nor as difficult as is often supposed. Wittgenstein was essentially an empiricist, and the difference between his early views (as set forth in the Tractatus) and the later views (as expounded in the Philosophical Investigations) lies chiefly in the fact that after 1930 he replaced his early version of reductionism with a subtler version. So he ended where he began, as an empiricist armed with a theory of meaning. This iconoclastic interpretation is sure to influence all future study of Wittgenstein and will provoke a reassessment of the nature of his contribution to philosophy.
 

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Contents

Wittgensteins Philosophical Beginnings
6
Neutral Monism
17
The Objects of the Tractatus
34
The Essence of the World Can Be Shown but Not Said
48
What the Solipsist Means is Quite Correct
58
Pure Realism and the Elimination of Private Objects
72
The Metaphysics of Wittgensteins Later Philosophy
86
Wittgensteins Phenomenalism
88
The Problem of Induction
198
Logical Possibilities and the Possibility of Knowledge
208
Logical Possibilities and Philosophical Method
210
The Search for a Phenomenalisms Theory of Knowledge
224
The Past Memory and the Private Language Argument
240
Memory Tenses and the Past
242
Wittgensteins Analysis of Mental States and Powers
272
Following a Rule
289

A New Philosophical Method
104
Wittgensteins Behaviorism
122
Wittgenstein and Kohler
138
Causation and Science in a Phenomenal World
156
Hume on Causation
158
Wittgensteins Humean View of Causation
177
The Private Language Argument
319
Names of Sensations and the Use Theory of Meaning
338
Name Index
346
Subject Index
348
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