Bryan's Dictionary of Painters and Engravers, Volume 2

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General Books, Jul 4, 2012 - 324 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...his own design. FALCO, Juan Conchillos. See Conchillos Falco. FALCONE, Aniello, called L'oracolo Delle Battaglie, was born at Naples in 1600, and was a scholar of Giuseppe Ribera, called Spagnoletto. He spent some years in France, where may still be met with several of his paintings, which are rare and highly valued. He distinguished himself as a painter of battles and skirmishes of cavalry, which he composed and designed with great fire and animation. He was equally correct in the drawing of his figures and horses, and their various movements are expressed with the most characteristic propriety. His touch is bold and free, and his colouring vigorous and effective. He was not less successful in his easel pictures than in those of a larger size; and his best works were Vol. II. I, esteemed little inferior to the admirable productions of Borgognone. Aniello Falcone was the founder of a large school in his native city, and was one of the masters of Salvator Rosa. He died at Naples in 1665. Among his paintings are the following: Madrid. Gallery. A Fight between Eomans and Barbarians. A Fight between Turkish and Chris tian Cavalry. 1631. Paris. Louvre. A Fight betweenTurksandChristians. Falcone was also an etcher, and there are by him twenty prints, in which he shows lively imagination and bold and intelligent design; they somewhat resemble the works of Pannigiano, and are executed with a light and spirited point. Among his etchings may be mentioned: A battle between naked Men on foot and on horseback. 1618. Apollo and Marsyas; after Parmeggiano. Four plates of Apostles: James the Less, James the Greater, John the Evangelist, and Matthew. A young Woman sleeping and suckling a Child. The Adoration of the Magi; after Raphael. FALCONET, ...

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