The Dead and the Living in Paris and London, 1500-1670

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jun 20, 2002 - History - 343 pages
But the impact of Reformation called into question many traditional attitudes, and although London was fairly successful in establishing a new consensus, burial of the dead became a serious point of conflict in Paris."--Jacket.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
London and Paris the setting of life and death
16
Lamentable pinfoulds of the deaths of men parish churchyards and churchyard burial
48
Innocents and outcasts civic and nonparochial churchyards
87
Making churches charnel houses the constraints of church burial
121
A fine and private place burial chapels vaults and tombs
149
Meet and convenient for my estate and degree funeral conventions and choices
178
The whole profit of the funeralls commercialisation and consumption
210
Conclusion
271
Mortality in the London parishes 1664
287
Mortality in the Paris parishes 1670
293
Funeral provision of Joan Brytten 1540
296
Funeral provision of Jeanne Passavent 1582
297
A note on sources
299
Bibliography
304
Index
333

The last love and ceremony funerals community and civic identity
236

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Page 312 - Illustrations of the Manners and Expences of Antient Times in England, in the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Centuries, deduced from the Accompts of Church-wardens, and other Authentic Documents, collected from Various Parts of the kingdom, with explanatory Notes. London, 1797. NICHOLS, JOHN. The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth.
Page 309 - The customs of London, otherwise called Arnold's Chronicle ; containing, among divers other matters, the original of the celebrated poem of the Nutbrown maid.
Page xii - Why, sir, his hide is so tanned with his trade, that he will keep out water a great while ; and your water is a sore decayer of your dead body.

About the author (2002)

Vanessa Harding is Senior Lecturer in London History at Birkbeck, London and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

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