J. S. Bach and the German Motet

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 28, 1995 - Music - 229 pages
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The motets of J. S. Bach are probably the most sophisticated works ever composed in the genre. Nevertheless, Daniel Melamed maintains, the view that they constitute a body of work quite separate from the German motet tradition is mistaken. He starts by considering the eighteenth-century understanding of the term itself and finds that Bach's own use does indeed agree with his contemporaries and that his motets are rooted in the conventions of the time, particularly in matters of musical construction, performing forces, and type of text. A fresh look at the repertory shows that Bach composed motets all through his career and an appreciation of the contemporary conception of the motet sheds light on questions of how and why Bach himself used the form. Professor Melamed also finds plenty of evidence that motets and motet style played an important role in Bach's exploration of the musical past.
 

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Contents

The term motet in the first half of the eighteenth century
7
J S Bachs use of the term motet
19
Bachs motets and their relation to the genre
35
rethinking authorship and dating
45
rethinking compositional history
63
Chronology style and performance practice of Bachs motets
98
The concept of the motetlike movement
109
85a BWV 61 mm 130
123
Bachs use of motet style in concerted works
151
KM Colla parte doublings in motetlike church cantata movements
154
The history of the Altbachisches Archiv
161
J S Bach and the Altbachisches Archiv
178
Christoph Bach Lieber Herr Gott wecke uns auf
184
Sebastian Kniipfer Erforsche mich Gott
189
Sebastian Kniipfer Erforsche mich Gott SBB Mus ms autogr
190
Leipzig
196

Motet style in Bachs Latin works and oratorios
133
97a BWV 24821 mm 14
144

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