The History of the Rebellion in the Year 1745

Front Cover
A. Strahan, 1802 - Culloden, Battle of, 1746 - 394 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 374 - ... levelled with earth and gravel. There were betwixt the trees, growing naturally on their own roots, some stakes fixed in the earth, which, with the trees, were interwoven with ropes, made of heath and birch twigs...
Page 92 - Being now in a condition to make our way into the capital of his Majesty's ancient kingdom of Scotland, we hereby summon you to receive us, as you are in duty bound to do ; and in order to it, we hereby require you, upon receipt of this, to summon the Town Council, and take proper measures for securing the peace and quiet of the city, which we are very desirous to protect. But if you suffer any of the Usurper's troops to enter the town...
Page 374 - This whole fabric hung, as it were, by a large tree, which reclined from the one end, all along the roof to the other, and which gave it the name of the Cage ; and by chance there happened to be two stones at a small distance from one another, in the side next the precipice, resembling the pillars of a chimney, where the fire was placed.
Page 100 - They acknowledged that he was a goodly person ; but they observed,- that even in that triumphant hour, when he was about to enter the palace of his fathers, the air of his countenance was languid and melancholy : that he looked like a gentleman and a man of fashion, but not like a hero or a conqueror.
Page 105 - ... of the history of their country, that the ancestors of this noble lord (once the most powerful peers in the south of Scotland) could, at a short warning, have raised in their own territories a body of men, whose approach that Highland army, which had got possession of the capital of Scotland (and was preparing to fight the whole military force in that kingdom) would not have dared to wait.
Page 21 - I hope you will think of some importance. You know very well that I am, like you, a Whig ; but I am also the neighbour and friend of the Highlanders, and intimately acquainted with most of their chiefs. For some time, I have been revolving in my mind different schemes for reconciling the Highlanders to government ; now I think the time is come to bring forward a scheme, which, in my opinion, will certainly have that effect.
Page 373 - I am sorry, Cluny, you and your regiment were not at Culloden : I did not hear, till very lately, that you were so near us that day.
Page 374 - Cage ; and by chance there happened to be two stones at a small distance from one another, in the side next the precipice, resembling the pillars of a chimney, where the fire was placed. The smoke had its vent out here, all along the face of the rock, which was so much of the same colour, that one could discover no difference in the clearest day. The Cage was no larger than to contain six or seven persons ; four of whom were frequently employed playing at cards, one idle looking on, one baking, and...
Page 187 - ... bring a horse from the stable, take the lame gentleman behind him, and go as far as his assistance was necessary. Thus equipped, they went on by Alloa to Tullyallan, a village near the sea, where they hired a boat to carry them off to the Vulture sloop-of-war, which was lying at anchor in the Frith of Forth. Captain Falconer of the Vulture received them very kindly, and gave them his barge to carry them to Queensferry.
Page 21 - A matter, replied the president, which I hope you will think of some importance. You know very well that I am, like you, a whig ; but I am also the neighbour and friend of the Highlanders, and intimately acquainted with most of their chiefs. For some time I have been revolving in my mind different schemes for reconciling the Highlanders to government, now I think the time is come to bring forward a scheme which in my opinion will certainly...

Bibliographic information