The Official Railway List: A Directory

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1884 - Railroads
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Page 148 - First class— Letters, and all other written matter whether sealed or unsealed and all other matter, sealed, nailed, sewed, tied or fastened in any manner, so that it cannot be easily examined, two cents per ounce or fraction thereof. Postal cards one cent each. Postal cards are...
Page 148 - DROP" LETTERS, that is, for the city or town where deposited, 2 cents where the carrier system is adopted, and 1 cent where there is no carrier system.
Page 148 - ... examined. Rate, 1 cent per ounce or fraction thereof. Limit of weight, 4 pounds. Full prepayment compulsory. The following are the postal rates with Europe. The rates for letters are, for the half ounce or fraction thereof, and those for newspapers for 2 ounces or fraction thereof. To Great Britain and Ireland, France, Spain, all parts of Germany, including Austria, Denmark, Switzerland, Italy, Russia, Norway, Sweden, Turkey (European and Asiatic), Egypt, letters 5 cents: newspapers 1 cent for...
Page 148 - This includes books, circulars, chromos, hand-bills, engravings, lithographs, magazines, music, newspapers, pamphlets, proof-sheets and manuscripts accompanying the same, reproductions by the electric pen, hektograph, metallograph, papyrograph, and, in short, any reproduction upon paper by any process, except handwriting, type-writing and the copying press, not in the nature of a personal correspondence.
Page 148 - Printed matter, in unsealed wrappers only (all matter enclosed in sealed envelopes notched on the sides or corners must pay letter rates), one cent for each two ounces or fraction thereof, which must be fully prepaid. This includes books, circulars, chromos, hand-bills, engravings, lithographs, magazines, music, pamphlets, proof-sheets and manuscripts accompanying the same, reproductions by the electric pen, hektograph, metallograph, papyrograph, photographs, and "blue prints...
Page 2 - Is the name given to a new blasting powder formed by the union of two ingredients — one a. solid and the other a fluid, both being absolutely INEXPLOSIVE until combined by the consumer. The engraving shows one manner of combination. The comminuted solid is packed in porous cloth cartridges.
Page 160 - A cord of wood equals 128 cubic feet, being 4 feet high, 4 feet wide, and 8 feet long. 42 cubic feet equals a ton of shipping. A cubic foot is equal to 1728 cubic inches. .037037 cubic >2rd. .803564 US struck bush, of 2150.42 cubic inches.
Page 119 - Vanderbilt avenue. New York. Auditor— James J. Farrell, Syracuse, NY " Master Mechanic and Car Builder— AP Tyler, Syracuse, NY Headmaster— JM Kyan, Syracuse, NY TAI.BOTTON— Gauge.
Page 159 - Inches 2=1= 67.2 8 = 4 = 1= 268.8 16= 8 = 2 = 1= 537.6 64 = 82 = 8 = 4 = 1 = 2150.42 The British Imperial Bushel contains 2218.2 Cubic Inches and = 1.03 US Bushels. AVOIRDUPOIS OR COMMERCIAL WEIGHT The Grain is the same in Troy, Apothecaries, and Avoirdupois Weights. The Standard Avoirdupois Pound is the weight of 27.7015 Cubic Inches of distilled water weighed in the air at 35.85 degrees Fahr., Barometer at 30 Inches. 27.343 Grains = 1 Drachm.
Page 161 - The standard gallon measures 231 cubic inches, or 8-33888 tbs. avoirdupois of pure water, at about 39-85 deg. Fahr., the barometer at 30 inches, gills. 4= 1 pint. 8= 2= 1 quart. 32= 8= 4= 1 gallon. 1344= 336= 168= 42=1 tierce, 2016= 504= 252= 63=lj4=l hogshead.

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