The Works of Thomas De Quincey, "The English Opium Eater": Including All His Contributions to Periodical Literature

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A. and C. Black, 1862
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Page 45 - For, if once a man indulges himself in murder, very soon he comes to think little of robbing; and from robbing he comes next to drinking and Sabbathbreaking, and from that to incivility and procrastination. Once begin upon this downward path, you never know where you are to stop. Many a man has dated his ruin from some murder or other that perhaps he thought little of at the time.
Page 334 - But then, it may be said, the other party, if other there was, might also be on the wrong side; and two wrongs might make a right. That was not likely. The same motive which had drawn us to the right-hand side of the road — viz., the luxury of the soft beaten sand, as contrasted with the paved centre — would prove attractive to others.
Page 312 - Every moment yon hear the thunder of lids locked down upon the mail-bags. . That sound to each individual mail is the signal for drawing off, which process is the finest part of the entire spectacle. Then come the horses into play.
Page 37 - But it is now time that I should say a few words about the principles of murder, not with a view to regulate your practice, but your judgment: as to old women, and the mob of newspaper readers, they are pleased with anything, provided it is bloody enough. But the mind of sensibility requires something more. First, then, let us speak of the kind of person who is adapted to the purpose of the murderer; secondly, of the place where; thirdly, of the time when, and other little circumstances. As to the...
Page 339 - The larger half of the little equipage had then cleared our over- towering shadow: that was evident even to my own agitated sight. But it mattered little that one wreck should float off in safety if upon the wreck that perished were embarked the human freightage. The rear part of the carriage — was that certainly beyond the line of absolute ruin? What power could answer the question? Glance of eye, thought of man, wing of angel, which of these had speed enough to sweep between the question and...
Page 333 - Still in the confidence of children that tread without fear every chamber in their father's house, and to whom no door is closed, we, in that Sabbatic vision which sometimes is revealed for an hour upon nights like this, ascend with easy steps from the sorrow-stricken fields of earth, upwards to the sandals of God. Suddenly, from thoughts like these, I was awakened u> a sullen sound, as of some motion on the distant road. It stole upon the air for a moment ; I listened in awe ; but then it died away....
Page 5 - Everything in this world has two handles. Murder, for instance, may be laid hold of by its moral handle (as it generally is in the pulpit and at the Old Bailey), and that, I confess, is its weak side ; or it may also be treated aesthetically, as the Germans call it — that is, in relation to good taste.
Page 46 - Very soon, sir,' he used to say, 'men will have lost the art of killing poultry: the very rudiments of the art will have perished!' In the year 1811 he retired from general society. Toad-in-the-hole was no more seen in any public resort. We missed him from his wonted haunts — nor up the lawn, nor at the wood was he.
Page 342 - Their stops and chords was seen ; his volant touch, Instinct through all proportions low and high, Fled and pursued transverse the resonant fugue.
Page 337 - Here, then, all had been done that, by me, could be done : more on my part was not possible. Mine had been the first step; the second was for the young man ; the third was for God. If, said I, this stranger is a brave man, and if, indeed, he loves the young...

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