The History of Poland

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1831 - Poland - 324 pages
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Page 269 - Bridges and public roads constructed at an enormous expense, frequently at the expense of the czar's treasury; the multitude of new habitations, remarkable for a neatness and a regard to domestic comfort never before observed; the embellishments introduced into the buildings not merely of the rich, but of tradesmen and mechanics; the encouragement afforded, and eagerly afforded...
Page 73 - It was approved in 1 191, by the empe.ror Henry VI. and pope Celestine III. By the statutes the knights were to be of noble descent, bound by their vows to celibacy, to the defence of the Christian church and the Holy Land, and to the exercise of hospitality towards pilgrims of their own nation; their habit was a black cross on a white mantle ; their rule that of St. Augustine. Their original number, besides their first grand master Henry of Waelfort, was twenty-four laymen, and seven priests; the...
Page 211 - ... Christian army, consisting of Poles, Saxons, Bavarians, and Austrians, amounting to 70,000 men. One who had been his rival as a candidate, the duke of Lorraine, gave a noble example of magnanimity by this submission, and by zealously cooperating in all his plans. On the morning of Sept.
Page 6 - ... whom they perceived hurrying from rank to rank in the act of stimulating her followers to the combat, and convinced that all opposition to her will would be worse than useless, they surrounded their chief, and asked him what advantage he hoped to gain from such an expedition. " If thou shouldst defeat the princess, will she pardon thee the loss of her troops ? If thou art subdued, will she be more disposed to love thee?" The passion of Rudiger blinded him to the rational remonstrances of his...
Page 269 - ... to procure the return to the general diet of such members only as were known to care less for their country than for their own fortunes. Then, instead of a diet being held every two years (in accordance with art. 87.), none was convoked from 1820 to 1825, and only one after the accession of Nicholas. Finally, an ordinance (issued in 1825) abolished the publicity of the debates in the two chambers ; and the most distinguished members of opposition were forcibly removed from Warsaw the night preceding...
Page v - DUNHAM. 1 vol. fcp. 8vo. with vignette title, 6s. cloth lettered. In submitting this work to his readers the author hopes, in justice both to them and himself, that he may not be charged with presumption for saying that it is no compilation. Its parts have been carefully derived from about sixty original sources— Polish, Bohemian, Hungarian, German, French, &c, some of which are very scarce in this country.
Page 6 - ... she be more disposed to love thee ? " The passion of Rudiger blinded him to the rational remonstrances of his followers : he persisted in his resolution of fighting ; they refused to advance : in utter despair he laid hands on himself, and turned his dying looks towards the camp of the Poles. Wenda, we are told, showed no sign of sympathy at the tragical news, but returned triumphant to Cracow. Her own end was not less violent. Whether, as is asserted, to escape similar persecution, or, as is...
Page 266 - When the journals, the legitimate outlets of popular feeling, were thus arbitrarily and impoliticly closed, secret societies began to multiply. A sort of political freemasonry connected the leaders of the meditated movement, and its ramifications extended as far as Wilna. Their avowed object was not merely to free their country and the grand duchy from the Russian yoke, but to unite their brethren of Gallicia and Posen in one common cause, and then openly to strike a blow for their dearest rights.
Page 272 - ... the time of their rising. It is well known — it has, indeed, been admitted by both Poles and Frenchmen, including the political organs of the latter — that emissaries from Warsaw held confidential meetings with the leaders of the revolution of July, and were instigated to rouse their countrymen by the promise of immediate aid from the government of the citizen king. That such aid was relied on with the fullest confidence, by the Polish patriots themselves, must be known to all who have recently...
Page 235 - You may cut off my hand or you may take my life; but as I am a marshal elected by a free people, so by a free people only can I be deposed. I wish to leave the place.

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