Letters to and from the late Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: to which are added some poems never before printed, Volume 2

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Printed for A. Strahan, 1788
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Page 144 - Newgate to demand their companions who had been seized demolishing the chapel. The keeper could not release them but by the Mayor's permission, which he went to ask; at his return he found all the prisoners released, and Newgate in a blaze. They then went to Bloomsbury, and...
Page 191 - I am not without my part of the calamity. No death since that of my Wife has ever oppressed me like this. But let us remember that we are in the hands of him who knows when to give, and when to take away, who will look upon us with mercy through all our variations of existence, and who invites us to call on him in the day of trouble. Call upon him in this great revolution of life, and call with confidence. You will then find comfort for the past, and support for the future.
Page 153 - This was a good rabble trick. The debtors and the criminals were all set at liberty ; but of the criminals, as has always happened, many are already retaken ; and two pirates have surrendered themselves, and it is expected that they will be pardoned.
Page 350 - I never thought confidence with respect to futurity any part of the character of a brave, a wise, or a good man. Bravery has no place where it can avail nothing; wisdom impresses strongly the consciousness of those faults, of which it is perhaps...
Page 269 - ... stroke, and that my speech was taken from me. I had no pain, and so little dejection in this dreadful state, that I wondered at my own apathy, and considered that perhaps death itself, when it should come, would excite less horrour than seems now to attend it.
Page 271 - I have loved you with virtuous affection; I have honoured you with sincere esteem- Let not all our endearments be forgotten, but let me have in this great distress your pity and your prayers. You see I yet turn to you with my complaints, as a settled and unalienable friend; do not, do not drive me from you, for I have not deserved either neglect or hatred.
Page 145 - The King said in council, that the magistrates had not done their duty, but that he would do his own; and a proclamation was published, directing us to keep our servants within doors, as the peace was now to be preserved by force. The soldiers were sent out to different parts, and the town is now at quiet.
Page 270 - My first note was necessarily to my servant, who came in talking, and could not immediately comprehend why he should read what I put into his hands. I then wrote a card to Mr. Allen, that I might have a discreet friend at hand to act as occasion should require. In penning this note I had some difficulty ; my hand, I knew not how nor why, made wrong letters.
Page 15 - ... undisguised in its natural process; nothing is inverted, nothing distorted; you see systems in their elements; you discover actions in their motives. Of this great truth, sounded by the knowing to the ignorant, and so echoed by the ignorant to the knowing, what evidence have you now before you! Is not my soul laid open in these veracious pages? Do not you see me reduced to my first principles?
Page 269 - I was alarmed, and prayed God, that however he might afflict my body, he would spare my understanding. This prayer, that I might try the integrity of my faculties, I made in Latin verse. The lines were not very good, but I knew them not to be very good : I made them easily, and concluded myself to be unimpaired in my faculties.

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