The Mechanics of Earthquakes and Faulting

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Cambridge University Press, May 2, 2002 - Science - 471 pages
3 Reviews
Our understanding of earthquakes and faulting processes has developed significantly since publication of the successful first edition of this book in 1990. This revised edition has therefore been thoroughly up-dated whilst maintaining and developing the major themes of the first edition. Graduate students and research scientists in the fields of seismology, physics, geology, geodesy and rock mechanics will benefit greatly from this book, which provides a unifying framework within which a wide range of faulting phenomena can be interpreted.
 

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It is a very good book. It contens a lot o very actualized information about of rock mechanics and seismologist. Plus, if You want to know the origin of the knoledgment on this topics, e.g.: which was the first friction law and who wrotte it? Is in the book.
The bad thing whit this book is that is very complicated to understand. Th autor tried to relate most of theories for describing one behavior, becouse none is the perfect. But that can become a problem if you want a fast answer. Some times you need to read a entire chapter for totally understand one page.
So, it is a good book if you want to be scientist in rock mechanics and seismology, but not good if you want a book for finding fast answers.
And is too expensive.
Good luck!
 

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this boobk for earquake

Contents

Brittle fracture of rock
1
112 Griffith theory
4
113 Fracture mechanics
9
114 Crack models
13
115 Macroscopic fracture criteria
17
12 Experimental studies of rock strength
21
121 Macroscopic strength
22
122 Fracture energies
28
44 Observations of earthquakes
211
442 Earthquake sequences
224
Clustering and migration
229
45 Mechanics of earthquake interactions
234
452 Mechanisms for the time delay
237
The seismic cycle
244
52 The crustal deformation cycle
247
521 Geodetic observations of strain accumulation
248

123 Discussion of fracture criteria in the light ofexperimental results
31
124 Effect of scale on strength
35
13 Pore fluid effects on fracture
37
132 Environmental effects on strength
39
14 The brittleplastic transition
43
141 General principles
44
142 The transition induced by pressure
46
143 The transition induced by temperature
48
144 Extrapolation to geological conditions
50
Rock friction
53
212 The adhesion theory of friction
55
213 Elastic contact theory of friction
57
214 Other frictional interactions
63
22 Experimental observations of friction
66
221 General observations
67
222 Effects of other variables on friction
68
223 Wear
77
23 Stick slip and stable sliding
81
the rate and state variable friction laws
83
233 Frictional stability regimes
87
234 Dynamics of stick slip
94
24 Friction under geological conditions
97
Mechanics of faulting
101
312 HubbertRubey theory of overthrustfaulting
104
313 Stress in the crust fault reactivation and friction
107
32 The formation and growth of faults
110
322 Growth and development of faults
115
323 Fault interactions and fault populations
126
33 Fault rocks and structures
135
331 Fault rocks and deformation mechanisms
136
332 Fabrics and surfaces
141
34 Strength and rheology of faults
145
341 A synoptic shear zone model
146
the downward continuation of faults
154
343 Thermomechanical effects of faulting
155
344 The debate on the strength of crustal fault zones
158
35 Fault morphology and mechanical effects of heterogeneity
168
352 Mechanical effects of fault irregularities
173
Mechanics of earthquakes
179
42 Theoretical background
182
422 Dynamic shear crack propagation
185
423 Simple applications to earthquake rupture
195
43 Earthquake phenomenology
198
432 Earthquake scaling relations
202
522 Models of strain accumulation
254
523 Postseismic phenomena
259
53 The earthquake cycle
265
532 Geological observations of recurrence times
273
533 Recurrence estimation with insufficient data
283
534 Seismicity changes during the loading cycle
287
535 The question of earthquake periodicity
291
54 Earthquake recurrence models
294
Seismotectonics
300
62 Seismotectonic analysis
303
622 Quantitative analysis
306
63 Comparative seismotectonics
309
632 Oceanic earthquakes
318
633 Continental extensional regimes
323
634 Intraplate earthquakes
326
635 Mechanism of deep earthquakes
329
636 Slow and tsunamigenic earthquakes
331
64 The relative role of seismic and aseismic faulting
333
641 Aseismicslip
334
642 Seismic coupling ofsubduction zones
337
65 Induced seismicity
341
651 Some examples
342
652 Mechanisms of reservoirinduced seismicity
344
653 Mininginduced seismicity
348
654 Induced seismicity as a stress gauge
350
Earthquake prediction and hazard analysis
351
712 Types of earthquake prediction
352
72 Precursory phenomena
358
722 Intermediateterm precursors
361
723 Shortterm precursors
375
73 Mechanisms of precursory phenomena
380
731 Nucleation models
381
732 Dilatancy models
384
733 Lithospheric loading models
390
734 Critical point theory
393
736 Earthquake prediction experiments
403
74 Earthquake hazard analysis
404
742 longterm hazard analysis
406
743 Analysis of instantaneous hazard
408
75 Future prospects and problems
412
References
415
Index
467
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