A Letter to a Whig Member of the Southern Independence Association

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Page 5 - Association formed in this country, the purpose of which was "to lend assistance to the Slave-owners of the Southern States in their attempt to effect a disruption of the American Commonwealth, and to establish an independent Power, having, as they declare, Slavery for its cornerstone." Mr. Smith endeavours to show that in doing so they would have committed a great folly and a still greater crime. Throughout the Letter many points of general and permanent importance are discussed.
Page 8 - Vice-President" at six years, and made the former ineligible to re-election ; it provided for the government of new Territories, and prohibited the enactment of any law " denying or impairing the right of property in negro slaves.
Page 30 - ... for internal government into well-established sovereignties, now confederated under a stable Central Administration, and claiming recognition, in accordance with those principles of British policy which have always been more inclined to help the oppressed than to justify and abet the oppressor, and ever to respect a unanimous national will. " The precedents of the separation of Belgium and...
Page 30 - Provividence, and anxious to place themselves in immediate connection with the manufacturers and consumers of Europe. " In short, the struggle is now felt to be, according to Earl Russell's pregnant expression, one for independence on the part of the South, and for empire on the part of the North ; for an independence, on the one hand, which it is equitable for themselves and desirable for the world that they should achieve ; for an empire, on the other hand, which is only possible at the price of...
Page 31 - ... devote itself to the cultivation of friendly feelings between the people of Great Britain and of the Confederate States ; and it will, in particular, steadily but kindly represent to the Southern States, that recognition by Europe must necessarily lead to a revision of the system of servile labour unhappily bequeathed to them by England, in accordance with the spirit of the age, so as to combine the gradual extinction of slavery with the preservation of property, the maintenance of the civil...
Page 30 - North, but sympathizing with the Confederates, the Southern Independence Association of London has been formed, to act in concert with that which is so actively and usefully at work in Manchester. It will serve as the rallying-point in London of all who believe that the dignity and interest of Great Britain will best be consulted by speedily and cheerfully...
Page 30 - The Association will also devote itself to the cultivation of friendly feelings between the people of Great Britain and of the Confederate States ; and it will, in particular, steadily but kindly represent to the Southern States, that recognition by Europe must necessarily lead to a revision of the system of servile labour...
Page 9 - ... hunger, and the horrible diseases that wait on hunger, at the palace gates. Pass from the dwellings of the rich to those of the poor, and you will own, that though we may be a great and powerful nation, a community in the full sense of the term we are not. These things are freely stated and even exaggerated by Conservative writers whose object it is to disparage the present in honour of the past ; and I do not see why it should be treason to state them when the object is to prevent the same party...
Page 5 - ... to lend assistance to the Slave-owners of the Southern States, in their attempt to effect a disruption of the American Commonwealth, and to establish an independent Power, having, as they declare, Slavery for its corner-stone. I am one of those who are convinced that in doing so she would commit a great folly and a still greater crime, the consequences of which would in the end fall on her own head. If you were an enemy to free institutions, and a lover of " Slavery, Subordination, and Government,"...
Page 30 - Greece, and of the re-construction of Italy, exist as modern instances to show that Great Britain is always ready to acknowledge, rather than to resist, a national uprising. It would be difficult to show that any of these countries was as well organiscd for self-government as the Confederate States have now been for nearly three years.

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