The Phrenological Journal and Miscellany, Volume 5

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Proprietors, 1829 - Phrenology
 

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Page 346 - And whosoever shall not receive you, nor hear your words, when ye depart out of that house or city, shake off the dust of your feet. Verily I say unto you, It shall be more tolerable for the land of Sodom and Gomorrah in the day of judgment, than for that city.
Page 238 - In the writings of other poets a character is too often an individual; in those of Shakespeare it is commonly a species.
Page 535 - A damn'd defeat was made. Am I a coward? Who calls me villain? breaks my pate across? Plucks off my beard and blows it in my face? Tweaks me by the nose? gives me the lie i' the throat, As deep as to the lungs?
Page 345 - For this man was counted worthy of more glory than Moses, inasmuch as he who hath builded the house, hath more honour than the house. 4 For every house is builded by some man; but he that built all things is God.
Page 573 - And Hazael said, Why weepeth my lord? And he answered, Because I know the evil that thou wilt do unto the children of Israel : their strongholds wilt thou set on fire, and their young men wilt thou slay with the sword, and wilt dash their children, and rip up their women with child.
Page 185 - If we listen to the voice of reason and duty, and pursue this night the line of conduct which they prescribe, some of us may live to see a reverse of that picture from which we now turn our eyes with shame and regret. We may live to behold the natives of Africa engaged in the calm occupations of industry, in the pursuits of a just and legitimate commerce. We may behold the beams of science and philosophy breaking in upon their land,* which at some...
Page 536 - Of thinking too precisely on the event, A thought which quarter'd, hath but one part wisdom And ever three parts coward, I do not know Why yet I live to say ' This thing's to do;' Sith I have cause and will and strength and means To do't.
Page 190 - The one led me to see a system in every star. The other leads me to see a world in every atom. The one...
Page 190 - The other teaches me that every grain of sand may harbour within it the tribes and the families of a busy population. The one told me of the insignificance of the world I tread upon. The other redeems it from all its insignificance ; for it tells me that in the leaves of every forest, and in the flowers of every garden, and in the waters of every rivulet, there are worlds teeming with life, and numberless as are the glories of the firmament.
Page 190 - ... in the flowers of every garden, and in the waters of every rivulet, there are worlds teeming with life, and numberless as are the glories of the firmament. The one has suggested to me...

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