Graham Greene's Catholic Imagination

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An American Academy of Religion Book, Jan 21, 2005 - Religion - 216 pages
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Much has been written about Graham Greene's relationship to his Catholic faith and its privileged place within his texts. His early books are usually described as "Catholic Novels" - understood as a genre that not only uses Catholic belief to frame the issues of modernity, but also offers Catholicism's vision and doctrine as a remedy to the present crisis in Western civilization. Greene's later work, by contrast, is generally regarded as falling into political and detective genres. In this book, Mark Bosco argues that this is a false dichotomy created by a narrowly prescriptive understanding of the Catholic genre and obscures the impact of Greene's developing religious imagination on his literary art.
 

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Contents

Graham Greenes Pattern in the Carpet
3
Greenes Appropriation of Oxford and the French Catholic Literary Revival
31
3 Vatican II Contexts and Greenes Catholic Imagination
71
Greenes Catholic Imagination in The Honorary Consul and The Human Factor
97
The Final Greeneing of the Catholic Imagination in Dr Fischer of Geneva and Monsignor Quixote
129
Coloring Catholicism Greene
155
Notes
161
References
189
Index
199
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