Chaos: Making a New Science

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Viking, 1987 - Science - 352 pages
27 Reviews
The author describes how scientists studying the growth of complexity in nature are discovering order and pattern in chaos. He explains concepts such as nonlinearity, the Butterfly Effect, universal constants, fractals, and strange attractors, and examines the work of scientists such as Mitchell J. Feigenbaum, Edward Lorenz, and Benoit Mandelbrot.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - librisissimo - LibraryThing

Read some time ago as part of my "physics book of the year" goal. It was interesting at the time, but I didn't invest a lot of brain-power in remembering details. Need to get an up-to-date book on the subject. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - keylawk - LibraryThing

Chaos studied here. The author makes the new way of understanding, well, everything, remarkably transparent. In the sense that I can see it, but still, I don't understand it. (!) This is not like ... Read full review

Contents

Prologue
1
Revolution
33
A revolution in seeing Pendulum clocks space balls and playground
53
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

He wrote the worldwide bestseller Chaos, which was nominated for the National Book Award. He was the 1990 McGraw Distinguished Lecturer at Princeton University.

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