Greyslaer: a romance of the Mohawk, Volume 2

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R. Bentley, 1840
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Page 186 - Then, sweet the hour that brings release From danger and from toil; We talk the battle over, And share the battle's spoil. The woodland rings with laugh and shout, As if a hunt were up, And woodland flowers are gathered To crown the soldier's cup. With merry songs we mock the wind That in the pine-top grieves, And slumber long and sweetly On beds of oaken leaves.
Page 105 - Strike — till the last armed foe expires; Strike — for your altars and your fires; Strike — for the green graves of your sires, God — and your native land!
Page 42 - We parted in sadness, but spoke not of parting ; We talk'd not of hopes that we both must resign ; I saw not her eyes, and but one tear-drop starting, Fell down on her hand as it trembled in mine...
Page 242 - Thus error's monstrous shapes from earth are driven ; They fade, they fly — but truth survives their flight ; Earth has no shades to quench that beam of heaven ; Each ray that shone, in early time, to light The faltering...
Page 151 - I know each lane, and every alley green, Dingle, or bushy dell, of this wild wood, And every bosky bourn from side to side, My daily walks and ancient neighbourhood...
Page 1 - Glories Of human greatness are but pleasing dreams, And shadows soon decaying. On the stage Of my mortality, my youth hath acted Some scenes of vanity, drawn out at length By varied pleasures, sweetened in the mixture, But tragical in issue. Beauty, pomp, With every sensuality our giddiness Doth frame an idol, are unconstant friends, When any troubled passion makes us halt On the unguarded castle of the mind.
Page 82 - Woe to the English soldiery That little dread us near! On them shall light at midnight A strange and sudden fear: When, waking to their tents on fire, They grasp their arms in vain, And they who stand to face us Are beat to earth again...
Page vii - ... villages, its humbler settlements and isolated habitations fallen upon by an untiring and relentless enemy, until, at the close of the contest, the appearance of the whole district was that of wide-spread heartsickening, and universal desolation. ** In no other section of the confederacy were *o many campaigns performed, so many battles fought, so many dwellings burnt, or so many murders committed.
Page 1 - Twill never be redeemed, if it be sown Amongst the people, fruitful to increase All evil they shall hear. Let me alone That I may cut off falsehood whilst it springs ! Set hills on hills betwixt me and the man That utters this, and I will scale them all, And from the utmost top fall on his neck, Like thunder from a cloud.
Page 20 - They left the ploughshare in the mould, Their flocks and herds without a fold, The sickle in the unshorn grain, The corn, half garnered, on the plain, And mustered, in their simple dress, For wrongs to seek a stern redress ; To right those wrongs, come weal, come woe, To perish, or o'ercome their foe.

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