Representative English Plays: From the Middle Ages to the End of the Nineteenth Century

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John Strong Perry Tatlock, Robert Grant Martin
Century Company, 1916 - English drama - 836 pages
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Page 573 - Plato, thou reason'st well ! — Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread, and inward horror, Of falling into nought ? why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us ; 'Tis heaven itself, that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man.
Page 529 - ... familiar — I shall never bear that— good Mirabell, don't let us be familiar or fond, nor kiss before folks, like my Lady Fadler and Sir Francis: nor go to Hyde Park together the first Sunday in a new chariot, to provoke eyes and whispers, and then never be seen there together again; as if we were proud of one another the first week, and ashamed of one another ever after.
Page 573 - The wide, the unbounded prospect lies before me : But shadows, clouds, and darkness, rest upon it. Here will I hold. If there's a power above us (And that there is, all Nature cries aloud Through all her works), he must delight in virtue ; And that which he delights in must be happy.
Page 680 - I ought to have my own way in everything, and what's more, I will, too. What! though I was educated in the country, I know very well that women of fashion in London are accountable to nobody after they are married. Sir Pet, Very well, ma'am, very well ; — so a husband is to have no influence, no authority?
Page 545 - To wake the soul by tender strokes of art, To raise the genius, and to mend the heart, To make mankind, in conscious virtue bold, Live o'er each scene, and be what they behold: For this the Tragic Muse first trod the stage, Commanding tears to stream through every age; Tyrants no more their savage nature kept, And foes to virtue wonder'd how they wept.
Page 248 - Puff, now we ha' the med'cine. My meat shall all come in, in Indian shells, Dishes of agate, set in gold, and studded With emeralds, sapphires, hyacinths, and rubies. The tongues of carps, dormice, and camels' heels, Boiled i' the spirit of Sol, and dissolved pearl,-.
Page 573 - Tis the Divinity that stirs within us, 'Tis heaven itself that points out an hereafter, And intimates Eternity to man. Eternity ! — thou pleasing — dreadful thought ! Through what variety of untried being — Through what new scenes and changes must we pass ! The wide, th' unbounded prospect lies before me ; But shadows, clouds, and darkness rest upon it.
Page 104 - Gallop apace, bright Phoebus, through the sky, And dusky night, in rusty iron car, Between you both shorten the time, I pray, That I may see that most desired day When we may meet these traitors in the field. Ah, nothing grieves me, but my little boy Is thus misled to countenance their ills. Come, friends, to...
Page 108 - But not of kings. The forest deer, being struck, Runs to an herb that closeth up the wounds : But when the imperial lion's flesh is gor'd, He rends and tears it with his wrathful paw, [And], highly scorning that the lowly earth Should drink his blood, mounts up to the air: And so it fares with me, whose dauntless mind Th...
Page 326 - Hark, now everything is still, The screech-owl and the whistler shrill Call upon our dame aloud, And bid her quickly don her shroud...

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